Eye Candy for Today: Adelaide Palmer still life

Still Life with Oranges, Adelaide Palmer
Still Life with Oranges, Adelaide Palmer (details)

Still Life with Oranges, Adelaide Palmer, oil on canvas, 16 x 24″ (40 x 60 cm). Link is to a page on Wikimedia Commons. I don’t know the location of the original.

I can’t find very many images or much information on Adelaide Palmer, a painter from New Hampshire who was active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The brief bio on Vose Galleries indices that she studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, and later with John Joseph Enneking.

Her take on this seemingly simple still life subject is rich with tactile suggestion and interesting variation in color.

 
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Not the Usual Van Goghs #4

Not the Usual Van Gogh's
Not the Usual Van Gogh's

In making decisions about what images they will show, art directors, publishers, reproduction print makers, and even museums, will often limit themselves to the most popular images in an artist’s oeuvre, particularly when dealing with very popular artists.

This leads to a condition I think of as the “Greatest Hits” syndrome; publishers don’t want to gamble on a possibly more interesting selection, and I suppose, understandably so. They’re simply weighing it as a financial decision, not an artistic one.

However, for those interested in art books and related items, the impression given is that the artists in question produced many fewer works than they actually did. As I’ve pointed out in three previous posts, this is certainly true in the case of Vincent van Gogh.

Here is another round of reproductions of lesser known works of Van Gogh, created over the short but astonishingly prolific 10 years or so that he painted.

In my past articles, I’ve linked to various sources of extensive listings of paintings by Van Gogh. In this case, I’ll point to Wikimedia Commons, which has a chronological list of all his known paintings (excluding watercolors and including a few questionable attributions), as a source of more “not the usual Van Goghs”.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Degas’ Woman on a Sofa

Woman on a Sofa, Edgar Degas, oil with touches of pastel ofer pencil
Woman on a Sofa, Edgar Degas, oil with touches of pastel ofer pencil

Woman on a Sofa, thined oil paint with touches of pastel over graphite, roughly 19 x 17″ (49 x 43 cm). Link is to image on the Metropolitan Museum of Art website, which has both zoomable and downloadable images.

The Met’s page for the piece indicates that it was not a preliminary work for another painting, but a work in itself. Drgas was apparently interested enough in pursuing the original drawing as larger and more complete that he expanded it by adding additional strips of paper to three sides.

I love the contrast between the delicately defined face of the woman and the rough, textural marks with which her form is indicated.

 
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Arvid Mauritz Lindström

Arvid Mauritz Lindstrom, landscape paintings
Arvid Mauritz Lindstrom, landscape paintings

Arvid Mauritz Lindström was a Swedish landscape painter active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He studied in Stockholm, Munich and Paris and lived in England for a number of years.

His landscapes are richly textural and atmospherically evocative of time and place.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: still life from the Roman School

Still Life with Fruit on a Stone Ledge from the Roman School, once attributed to Caravaggio
Still Life with Fruit on a Stone Ledge from the Roman School, once attributed to Caravaggio (details)

Still Life with Fruit on a Stone Ledge, Roman School,

I have seen this beautiful still life at times attributed to Caravaggio (Michelangelo Marisi), or to a follower of his.

Sotheby’s made no such direct claim when the painting passed through their auction house in 2013, referring to it instead as attributed to an unnamed artist of the Roman School, but the extensive notes on their page devoted to the item mention Carvaggio more than a dozen times.

It does seem similar in nature to a still life painting of a basket of fruit acknowledged to be by Caravaggio, but there are also other paintings from the time and place that also appear to be in a similar style that are attributed to “a follower of Caravaggio“.

Regardless of the painting’s attribution, it is clearly an extraordinary still life, with an tactile presence that must be palpable in person.

There is a Wikipedia page devoted to the painting, though it inexplicably contains a poorly reproduced image.

 
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Justin Gerard (update)

Justin Gerard fantasy illustration
Justin Gerard fantasy illustration

Justin Gerard is an illustrator based in Georgia who works in the publishing, gaming and film industries. I first profiled him in 2009, and pointed out my admiration for his richly imaginative dragons. Since then, in the midst of his other work, he has been creating a series of equally imaginative “Monster of the Month” illustrations.

Gerard’s monsters are wonderfully over-the-top and beautifully rendered in the fantasy art/concept art vein of dramatic imagery. He can somehow make them simultaneously gruesome and visually charming.

There is a portfolio of his work on the GalleryGerard website. You will find more examples on his ArtStation portfolio, in which you will also find close-up crops and preliminary drawings for many of his Monster of the Month images.

Gerard is regular contributor to the Muddy Colors website and among his articles you can find walkthroughs and descriptions of technique.

Justin Gerard is married to illustrator Annie Stegg Gerard, who I have also previously profiled.

 
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