Eye Candy for Today: Heinrich Reinhold pencil drawing

Heinrich Reinhold pencil landscape drawing: A View of Civitella from the Serpentara next to Olevano
Heinrich Reinhold pencil landscape drawing: A View of Civitella from the Serpentara next to Olevano (details)

A View of Civitella from the Serpentara next to Olevano, graphite on paper, roughly 9 x 12 inches (23 x 30 cm), in the collection of the Getty Museum, additional zoomable image on Google Art Project, downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons.

This drawing by German painter Heinrich Reinhold, who was active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, gives us a wonderful view of a landscape in Tuscany. I think it demonstrates how effectively graphite can be used to convey the textures and atmospheric effects of a grand landscape.

Look at how subtle but effective the difference in value is between the distant mountain and the foreground rocks and trees. I also admire the way the directional hatching blends into areas of tone, but retains the visual charm of the pencil marks, in much the same was as “painterly” brush strokes can in a printing.

 
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Sija Hong

Sija Hong illustration
Sija Hong illustration

Originally from China and now based in New York, Sija Hong is an illustrator whose clients include Scientific American, Tor, Chronicle Books, Lerner Publishing Group, and Little Brown & Company Books, among others.

Her illustrations are swirling, multilayered cascades of imagery and design elements, shimmering with vibrant color. Hong tames these seemingly wild ingredients with controlled color schemes and underlying patterns to bring them into narrative focus.

She works in a combination of traditional and digital media, starting with the former and bringing her work to a finish digitally.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Alois Arnegger spring landscape

Alois Arnegger spring landscape, oil on canvas
Alois Arnegger spring landscape, oil on canvas

Primavera, Alois Arnegger

I don’t know about you, but I could use a bit of Spring right about now, even if it’s only in the form of a painting.

Austrian painter Alois Arnegger, who was active in the early 19th century, invites us to walk into an idyllic spring day, rich with textural brushwork and spattered suggestions of blossoms.

I don’t know anything official about this painting, like its size or location, though I assume it’s oil on canvas. I found this image in a post of various art images on a Russian blog (scroll down) published under the name of “marylai”, (large image here).

 
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Hopper in Paris

Hopper in Paris. paintings
Hopper in Paris. paintings

When Edward Hopper was in his early twenties, he lived in Paris for a year, and later returned on several occasions. He painted and sketched while he was there, as well as being exposed to art and artists he might not have encountered otherwise, laying the groundwork for his developing signature style.

Hopper in Paris” was a recent show at the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC, consisting of paintings on loan from the extensive collection of the Whitney Museum in NY.

The Phillips Collection’s online presence for the exhibit unfortunately seems limited to one of those annoying “virtual gallery” interfaces, in which you must drag and click, drag and click, drag and click just to get a view of an individual image. I thought we had gotten rid of these gimmicks back in the 90s, but they’re apparently back thanks to the popularity of VR.

Fortunately, there are better places to view the images, such as this article on Fine Art Connoisseur, and this one on France Amérique.

 
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Eya Candy for Today: Stillman’s Love’s Messenger

Love's Messenger, Marie Spartali Stillman, watercolor and tempera
Love's Messenger, Marie Spartali Stillman, watercolor and tempera

Love’s Messenger, Marie Spartali Stillman, watercolor, tempera and gold paint on paper, 32 x 26 inches (116 x 100 cm).

I’ve stood in front of this beautiful painting in the Delaware Art Museum more times than I can count, marveling not only at the beautiful composition and subtle color, but at the remarkable painting technique and the delicately textural surface.

It appears to be a stipple technique often used by late 19th century British watercolorists, to wonderful effect.

For a long time, I remember the medium listed as simply “watercolor”, and I assumed the obviously opaque passages, such as the white highlights on the bird’s head and wings, were gouache. The museum’s webpage for the painting now lists the materials as watercolor and tempera. I’m still unsure what that means, exactly, as the term “tempera” is often applied to paints other than egg tempera.

For more, see my previous posts on Marie Spartali Stillman.

 
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Charles Dana Gibson

Charles Dana Gibson, pen and ink illustration
Charles Dana Gibson, pen and ink illustration

Charles Dana Gibson was one of America’s great “Golden Age” illustrators, and one of its finest proponents of pen and ink illustration.

He is particularly known for his drawings of the “Gibson Girl”, an idealized example of what at the time was becoming known as the “New Woman”. The Gibson Girl became a symbol of women who were coming to the fore and taking on new roles in society. Gibson’s drawings also made the Gibson Girl a fashion icon.

There are a number of remarkable pen and ink artists from that period, toward the end of the 19th century and into the 20th, but few had the same combination of delicate subtlety and bold freedom that exemplified Gibson’s command of the pen.

His illustrations ranged to many other subjects. The Library of Congress has a nice online exhibition feature that outlines some of his major areas of interest, while focusing on the Gibson Girl.

Many of the reproductions of Gibson’s drawings appear to reflect the discoloration of the paper on which they were drawn, but they are still highly enjoyable.

For more, see my previous posts on Charles Dana Gibson.

 
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