Those who are not conversant in works of art are often surprised at the high value set by connoisseurs on drawings which appear careless, and in every respect unfinished; but they are truly valuable... they give the idea of a whole.
- Sir Joshua Reynolds
We do not see things as they are, we see them as we are.
- Anais Nin
 

 

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Tim Warnock (update)

Posted by Charley Parker at 9:56 am

Tim Warnock
Matte paintings are paintings that produce the illusion of a background or part of a background in film. They can also form part of a foreground.

Matte paintings are almost as old as movies themselves, and were originally painted on glass, and positioned in front of, and/or behind the actors (or stop motion creatures), creating the illusion in the camera of a complete scene.

Modern matte painting is composited, and usually created, digitally.

Tim Warnock is both a matte painter and a concept artist, and some time ago retired his paintbrushes in favor of a Wacom stylus.

I wrote a brief post about Tim Warnock back in 2005; since then his online portfolio has been redone and, of course, there is much new work.

His portfolio is divided between matte painting (image above, top and detail, bottom left) and concept art (above, middle and detail, bottom, right).

Warnock brings a talent for crisp realism, characteristic of matte painting, to his concept art. In both cases he uses sharp value contrasts and carefully controlled color relationships to give his scenes high definition and visual drama.

2 comments for Tim Warnock (update) »

RSS feed for comments on this post.

  1. Comment by oakling
    Wednesday, May 28, 2008 @ 2:25 pm

    that is freaking gorgeous. it’s interesting to find out how they use art in making parts of movies that I assumed were actually sets, and it’s nice to be reminded that art made on a computer is still art!

  2. Comment by Daniel van Benthuysen
    Wednesday, May 28, 2008 @ 11:01 pm

    Wow.

    Fascinating how technology has changed art and how some aspects remain the same. We pay the price of a movie ticket to see movie stars prance around in front of the amazing, panoramic and awe-inspiring work of artists like Warnock. In 1859 Frederic Church charged admission to see his similarly inspiring, colossal ‘Heart of the Andes,’ a 66 x 119 inch canvas that toured some American cities and is the second largest painting in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC.

    Unfortunately, today, unless you stay to read through all the credits which include the caterers and the personal assistants, you wouldn’t know who Mr. Warnock is. I can only hope he makes ridiculously great piles of money doing this.

Leave a comment

(required)

(required but not published)

 
Display Ads on Lines and Colors (1st tier): $25/week or $75/month.

Please note that display ads for lines and colors are limited to arts related topics and may not be animated.
Display Ads on Lines and Colors (2nd tier): $20/week or $65/month.

Please note that display ads for lines and colors are limited to arts related topics and may not be animated.




Donate Life

The Gift of a Lifetime
Donate Life