He who knows how to appreciate colour relationships, the influence of one colour on another, their contrasts and dissonances, is promised an infinitely diverse imagery.
- Sonia Delaunay
Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
- Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
 

 

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Femke Hiemstra

Posted by Charley Parker at 11:04 am

Femke Hiemstra
Dutch artist Femke Hiemstra paints her richly detailed and wonderfully textural paintings of animals (anthropomorphic and otherwise), odd characters and fantastical landscapes on found objects. Her odd shaped “canvases” are the covers of old books, wooden holy water fonts and antique wooden panels.

Her mixed media pieces also include typography, sometimes completing the illusion that the antique book on the surface of which she is painting, for example, is a real but very different book.

Hiemstra studied illustration at the School of Arts in Utrecht and “Illustration and Visualizing” at the School of Graphic Arts in Amsterdam, where she currently lives and works.

Her mixed media technique includes thin layers of acrylic and water, colored pencils and sometimes chalk and oil crayons.

Heimstra is part of a three person show at Merry Karnowsky Gallery that is on view until August 27, 2011.

[Via beinArt Collective]

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Augustin Lesage

Posted by Charley Parker at 11:50 pm

Augustin Lesage
Augustin Lesage was a French painter associated with “outsider art” (L’Art Brut), art created outside of normal cultural definitions.

A coal miner from the age of 14, Lesage supposedly heard a voice deep in the mine say “One day you’ll be a painter!”, followed by a succession of other voices, some of which he took to be the voice of his sister Mary, who died at the age of three.

He began with “automatic drawing”, a practice the Surrealists employed to produce art directly form the subconscious, but one also associated with communicating with the departed by spiritualists. He moved from there into painting, guided by the voices, and began to produce large scale canvasses in which he explored kalidoscopic images, repetitions of surface patterns and themes of spiritualism and symbolism.

Most of the images in this post, and those in many of the resources I list below, came from shawna-bo-bonna’s Flickr stream.

The two images above, bottom, which are both titled A symbolic Composition of the Spiritual World but were done two years apart, became the inspiration for animations created in 2010 by Max Hattler (see my previous post 1923 aka Heaven and 1925 aka Hell by Max Hattler).

Posted in: Outsider Art   |   1 Comment »

1923 aka Heaven and 1925 aka Hell by Max Hattler

Posted by Charley Parker at 10:29 pm

1923 aka Heaven and 1925 aka Hell by Max Hattler, A symbolic Composition of the Spiritual World by Augustin Lesage
1923 aka Heaven (images above, top five) and 1925 aka Hell (above, bottom 5) are two animated film by Max Hattler that were inspired by two paintings by French outsider artist Augustin Lesage.

The two paintings are both named A symbolic Composition of the Spiritual World, one painted in 1923 (above, middle left) and one in 1925 (middle right).

Hattler’s animation loops are just that, motion and sound, no story, and they repeat phrases and sequences with variations in color and other characteristics. They are exercises in rythym, pattern repetition and recursion. They were created over a five day period with students at the Animation Workshop in Viborg , Denmark.

You can see more of Hattler’s animations on his website; I’ll try to post more about Augustin Lesage in an upcoming post.

[Via DATAISNATURE and MetaFilter]

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

1896 Paintings on Wikimedia Commons

Posted by Charley Parker at 11:47 pm

1896 Paintings on Wikimedia Commons: Daniel Ridgeway Knight, Albert Anker, Ivan Shishkin, Alfons Mucha, Ilya Repin, Carl Schuster, James Jabusa Shannon, John William Waterhouse, Anders Zorn, Kryzhitsky Ozero, Viktor Vasnetsov

Lets set the Wayback Machine and take a walk through the year 1896 by way of the Wikimedia Commons page for that category.

Yes, the image quality is uneven, but there are gems to be found, and this is just a selection from the introductory page for this category. You can drill down into subcategories, and of course into listings for individual artists.

For more on browsing image resources on Wikimedia Commons, see my post from 2010.

(Images above: Daniel Ridgeway Knight, Albert Anker, Ivan Shishkin, Alfons Mucha, Ilya Repin, Carl Schuster, James Jabusa Shannon, John William Waterhouse, Anders Zorn, Kryzhitsky Ozero, Viktor Vasnetsov)

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Charles E. Williams II

Posted by Charley Parker at 11:29 pm

Charles E. Williams II
I’ve always been fascinated with works of realism in which the representational image, which presents an illusion of reality, transitions to obvious marks on paper or paint strokes on canvas at the edges, allowing us to see both the drawn or painted illusion and the reality of marks on a surface in the same image.

In many of the paintings of Charles E. Williams II, this effect is pronounced and takes the form of dripped paint marks at the bottom edges of his compositions, which are often of scenes involving creeks, streams or other bodies of water.

The effect is striking, highlighting both our perceptions of three dimensional scenes on a two dimensional surface, and Williams’ skills as a realist painter, without which the effect would be negligible.

Williams was born and is based in South Carolina; he studied fine art at the Savannah College of At and Design in Georgia.

In addition to his website, Williams posts his work to a blog, and you can also find galleries of his work on Bluecanvas and Robert Lange Studios.

[Via Escape Into Life]

Monday, August 15, 2011

Paintings of Louis Comfort Tiffany

Posted by Charley Parker at 10:34 pm

Paintings of Louis Comfort Tiffany
As I mentioned in my post from 2007, Louis Comfort Tiffany, in addition to designing beautiful Art Nouveau artifacts and stained glass, was an accomplished painter.

The Tiffany Studios Research Center now lists resources I didn’t include in my previous post.

[Via MetaFilter]

Sunday, August 14, 2011

From Beasts to Babar: Ten Illustrators of Children’s Books

Posted by Charley Parker at 7:53 pm

From Beasts to Babar: Ten Illustrators of Children's Books, Bernie Fuchs, Gennady Spirin, Henrik Drescher, Jeanne de Sainte Marie
The Telluride Gallery of Fine Art in Colorado is presenting an exhibition titled From Beasts to Babar: Ten Illustrators of Children’s Books that features work by Bernie Fuchs, Maurice Sendak, Etienne Delessert, Gennady Spirin, Henrik Drescher and others.

Unfortunately, the images on the gallery’s site are small, but even for those who can’t get to the show, the selection if interesting — and you can follow up with individual searches.

From Beasts to Babar is on display until August 28, 2011.

(Images above: Bernie Fuchs, Gennady Spirin, Henrik Drescher, Jeanne de Sainte Marie)

[Suggestion courtesy of Paul Antonson (see my post on Paul Antonson)]

Posted in: Illustration   |   3 Comments »

Selected (Mike Guppy)

Posted by Charley Parker at 6:20 pm

Selected (Mike Guppy)
another sight is a website on which artist and designer Mike Guppy displays a series of short art pieces, most using animated gifs, JavaScript, CSS and other web based techniques.

Of them, the one I find most interesting is Selected ~ 2011, a series of animated GIF images in which familiar artworks by Botticelli, Leonardo, Magritte, Munch and Fuselli are represented with with principle elements missing; their formerly occupied space represented in the image by an animation of a selection marquee (sometimes known as “marching ants”), as found in image editors like Photoshop, Fireworks, GIMP and others.

The image above, and detail below it, are still screenshots of the animated image.

When viewing the gallery for Selected, be aware that all of the pieces are on the same page, but arranged horizontally, requiring the use of a horizontal scrollbar at bottom to view them.

Guppy also has a blog, More Sight on which some of the pieces appear.

[Via BoingBoing]

Posted in: AmusementsDigital Art   |   1 Comment »
 
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