Monday, October 22, 2012

Japanese Prints of the 18th and 19th Century

Japanese Prints from the 18th and 19th centuries: Katsushika Hokusai, Katsukawa Shunkō Ii, Utagawa Hirosige I, Utagawa Hirosige, Shosai Ikkei, Kikugawa Eiza, Kitagawa Utamaro
The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow has placed online a catalog of their collection of Japanese Prints from the 18th and 19th centuries.

You can browse through sections for landscapes, beauties, actors, warriors, sumo wrestlers, flowers and birds.

You can also browse by artist or school, and there are additional reference materials.

(Images above: Katsushika Hokusai, Katsukawa Shunkō Ii, Utagawa Hirosige I, Utagawa Hirosige, Shosai Ikkei, Kikugawa Eiza, Kitagawa Utamaro)

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5 thoughts on “Japanese Prints of the 18th and 19th Century

  1. ceparie

    I developed a much greater appreciation for Japanese prints once I understood how they were made. On your link to the museum and prints, their sidebar includes a great demonstration of the wood block process. How wonderful that we live in an age where work like this can be shared for all to see.

  2. Lorette

    As a fervent ‘Van Gogh-lover’ I can proudly announce that the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam houses a unique collection of almost 500 Japanese prints. The majority of these come from the collection that Vincent van Gogh and his brother Theo accumulated during the 1880s.

  3. Charley Parker Post author

    Yes, some of those images we in the west consider quintessentially Japanese, like Katsushika Hokusai’s The Wave were demonstrating the influence of European art. My understanding is that the influence of European prints, initially illegal to import into Japan, came at first from discarded printed matter that was used as wrapping or padding for trade goods.

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