He who knows how to appreciate colour relationships, the influence of one colour on another, their contrasts and dissonances, is promised an infinitely diverse imagery.
- Sonia Delaunay
Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
- Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
 

 

Monday, October 22, 2012

Japanese Prints of the 18th and 19th Century

Posted by Charley Parker at 9:55 pm

Japanese Prints from the 18th and 19th centuries: Katsushika Hokusai, Katsukawa Shunkō Ii, Utagawa Hirosige I, Utagawa Hirosige, Shosai Ikkei, Kikugawa Eiza, Kitagawa Utamaro
The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow has placed online a catalog of their collection of Japanese Prints from the 18th and 19th centuries.

You can browse through sections for landscapes, beauties, actors, warriors, sumo wrestlers, flowers and birds.

You can also browse by artist or school, and there are additional reference materials.

(Images above: Katsushika Hokusai, Katsukawa Shunkō Ii, Utagawa Hirosige I, Utagawa Hirosige, Shosai Ikkei, Kikugawa Eiza, Kitagawa Utamaro)

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5 comments for Japanese Prints of the 18th and 19th Century »

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  1. Comment by ceparie
    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 @ 12:48 am

    I developed a much greater appreciation for Japanese prints once I understood how they were made. On your link to the museum and prints, their sidebar includes a great demonstration of the wood block process. How wonderful that we live in an age where work like this can be shared for all to see.

  2. Comment by Lorette
    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 @ 6:09 am

    As a fervent ‘Van Gogh-lover’ I can proudly announce that the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam houses a unique collection of almost 500 Japanese prints. The majority of these come from the collection that Vincent van Gogh and his brother Theo accumulated during the 1880s.

  3. Comment by Lorette
    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 @ 6:15 am

    Hokusai Katsushika (1760 – 1849) said that all he had done before the age of 70 was not worth bothering with.

  4. Comment by Donald Pittenger
    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 @ 6:08 pm

    Note the use of Western-style perspective in some of the prints. Influence was a two-way street in the late 1800s and later.

  5. Comment by Charley Parker
    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 @ 6:57 pm

    Yes, some of those images we in the west consider quintessentially Japanese, like Katsushika Hokusai’s The Wave were demonstrating the influence of European art. My understanding is that the influence of European prints, initially illegal to import into Japan, came at first from discarded printed matter that was used as wrapping or padding for trade goods.

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