He who knows how to appreciate colour relationships, the influence of one colour on another, their contrasts and dissonances, is promised an infinitely diverse imagery.
- Sonia Delaunay
Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
- Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
 

 

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney at NHIA

Posted by Charley Parker at 8:41 am

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney at NHIA
Long time readers of Lines and Colors will know that James Gurney is one of my favorite contemporary illustrators, as well as being a superb landscape painter and the author of several books on art technique.

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney is an exhibition that opens today at the New Hampshire Institute of Art and features work from his iconic series of beautiful adventure picture books.

In them, Gurney brings a sensibility of 19th century Gilded Age painting to the contemporary fascination with dinosaurs, and the results are quite wonderful.

Two of the titles from the series have recently been reissued in deluxe editions: Dinotopia: The World Beneath 20th Anniversary Edition and Dinotopia: A Land Apart from Time 20th Anniversary Edition.

Though I haven’t seen this particular exhibition, I had the pleasure of seeing a similar exhibition in Delaware in 2010.

Even if you haven’t a taste for the subject, or for fantastical art in general, Gurney is first and foremost a terrific painter, and seeing his work in person is a treat.

Though the Institute unfortunately hasn’t posted a gallery of work from the show on their site, you can see more of Gurney’s work from Dinotopia on the official Dinotopia website, as well as Gurney’s website and his always fascinating blog, Gurney Journey.

As part of the Institute’s Distinguished American Artists Discussing Art series, Gurney will be delivering a lecture tonight, February 20, 2013 at 7:00 pm titled Worldbuilding: How to Developa Fantasy Universe. Tickets are $20 and available online.

The opening for the exhibition is at 5:00 pm tonight. The opening and the exhibit are free to the public.

Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney will be on view at the NHIA until March 13, 2013.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Eye Candy for Today: Hassam’s Rainy Day

Posted by Charley Parker at 1:31 pm

Rainy Day, Boston, Childe Hassam
Rainy Day, Boston, Childe Hassam.

“American Impressionism” (i.e. painterly realism) in the hands of one of its foremost proponents.

On Google Art Project. Click in lower right of image for zoom controls.

Original is in the Toledo Museum of Art.

illustrators magazine

Posted by Charley Parker at 9:11 am

illustrators magazine: Denis McLoughlin, Ian Kennedy, Angel Badia Camps, Cheri Herouard, Mick Brownfield
illustrators is a new quarterly illustration art magazine from the UK.

For those familiar with magazines like ImageS, Illustration and illo (links to my posts), this is a welcome addition to the small range of quarterly publications dedicated to showcasing illustration, both contemporary and classic. In this case it is with a UK and European perspective rather than an American one, and the inclusion of comics illustrators.

I received a review copy of illustrators #1 (images above) and found it well produced, with excellent image quality and the kind of print production values that make it seem as much a book as a magazine.

In depth, style and era of illustration, the magazine strikes a nice balance. In this issue the lead article was extensive, running some 40 pages, the second article detailed but a bit shorter at 20, then a 10 page article article and some shorter ones. The issue wraps up with book reviews and, like the other quarterly illustration magazines, has ads that are often as much of interest to the reader as the content.

The illustrators website lists the currently available issues (up to #3 as of this writing) and gives a good sized click-through preview of issue #1, and a shorter one of issue #2.

(Images above: Denis McLoughlin – cover and second down, Ian Kennedy, Angel Badia Camps, Cheri Herouard, Mick Brownfield)

Posted in: Illustration   |   Comments »

Monday, February 18, 2013

Stephen Gilpin

Posted by Charley Parker at 12:30 pm

Stephen Gilpin
Stephen Gilpin is a Kansas based illustrator whose clients include Harper Collins, Random House, Simon and Schuster, Scholastic and the Wall Street Journal.

He has a fresh, crisp, cartoon illustration style well suited to his work in children’s book illustration.

He strikes a nice balance between rendering and flatter areas of color, while keeping the jaunty feeling of his lively linework.

You can see Gilpin’s work on his blog and the Flickr stream that serves as his portfolio, as well as his “Billy the Squid” Etsy store.

The best sampling of his work, however, is the portfolio on the site of his artists’ rep, Shannon Associates.

Posted in: CartoonsIllustration   |   Comments »

Healy’s Lincoln

Posted by Charley Parker at 11:41 am

Portrait of Abraham Lincoln by George Healy
Today is “Presidents’ Day” here in the U.S.

Originally it was a celebration of the birthday of first president George Washington. A later holiday celebrating the birthday of Abraham Lincoln, also in February, was folded in, the day was moved to a Monday in the general vicinity of the dates, made a postal holiday and became most useful as an occasion for car dealers and furniture stores to hold sales.

Though the focus is usually on Washington (see my posts on Gilbert Stuart, and Gilbert Stuart, not just presidents), there is a lot of attention being paid to 17th president Abraham Lincoln lately, much of it coming from acclaim for the recent Spielberg biopic.

Portraits of Lincoln are not as numerous or familiar as those of Washington, except perhaps for his profile on the U.S. penney.

The most notable is the posthumous portrait of Abraham Lincoln (above, top, larger here), by American portrait artist George Healy.

Lincoln sat for Healy and the artist made sketches in preparation for a portrait, but Lincoln was assassinated before the actual portrait could be painted.

Healy took his reference and created a group portrait of Lincoln and the Union generals in a strategy session on the steam boat River Queen just before the end of the Civil War, titled The Peacemakers (above, bottom two), in which Lincoln is presented leaning forward, chin in hand in rapt attention, framed by a rainbow signifying the end of the conflict.

Healy went on to use his sketches and the pose in that painting to create the single portrait shown above, top, now in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Though it was rejected as an official White House portrait of Lincoln by then president Ulysses S. Grant, in favor of a more prosaic standing portrait by William F. Cogswell, Healy’s portrait was purchased by Lincoln’s son, Robert Todd Lincoln, who said of it: “I have never seen a portrait of my father which is to be compared with it in any way.”

Sunday, February 17, 2013

Eye Candy for Today: Carlson woodland scene

Posted by Charley Parker at 9:50 pm

John F. Carlson
John F. Carlson (unkonwn title). Photo by Justin Wisniewski, from his blog.

See my post on John Fabian Carlson.

Posted in: Eye Candy for Today   |   Comments »

The Art of Illustration, PBS Off Book

Posted by Charley Parker at 9:12 pm

The Art of Illustration, PBS Off Book, Yuko Shimizu, Sean Murphy and Molly Crabapple
The Art of Illustration is a 7 minute video feature that includes a (very) brief history of illustration from moderator Steve Guarnaccia, and short interviews with illustrators and comics artists Yuko Shimizu, Sean Murphy and Molly Crabapple (above, top to bottom).

It is one episode of the continuing PBS web video series Off Book (also here).

[Suggestion courtesy of Gregory Frost]

Posted in: ComicsIllustration   |   Comments »

Animal Kingdom at Gallery Nucleus

Posted by Charley Parker at 8:48 am

Animal Kingdom at Gallery Nucleus, Christopher Buzelli, Jeremy Wilson, Juan Trevieso, Sachin Teng, Lucrezia Bieler, Bill Carman, Joy Ang, Bruce Jensen, Victo Ngai
The Animal Kingdom is a show that opened yesterday at Gallery Nucleus in Alhambra, CA and runs until March 3, 2013.

(Images above: Christopher Buzelli, Jeremy Wilson, Juan Trevieso, Sachin Teng, Lucrezia Bieler, Bill Carman, Joy Ang, Bruce Jensen, Victo Ngai)

 
Display Ads on Lines and Colors (1st tier): $25/week or $75/month.

Please note that display ads for lines and colors are limited to arts related topics and may not be animated.
Display Ads on Lines and Colors (2nd tier): $20/week or $65/month.

Please note that display ads for lines and colors are limited to arts related topics and may not be animated.




Donate Life

The Gift of a Lifetime