Impressionists on the Water

Impressionists on the Water
French Impressionism has always been associated with water. The painters themselves were drawn to the seashore and the rivers of France, filling their canvasses with dappled colors of light dancing across the surface of water under a variety of conditions.

Impressionists on the Water is an exhibition of 80 paintings and drawings by Impressionists, Post-Impressionists and Impressionist precursors now on exhibit at the Fine Arts Musem of San Francisco: Leigon of Honor

There is a small preview of the exhibit on the FAMSF website, and another gallery accompanying a review of the exhibit on SFGate. (Should the relatively small galleries simply whet your appetite for online images of Impressionist paintings, WikiPaintings has a pretty good selection.)

Impressionist on the Water will be on display at the FAMSF until October 13, 2013. It then move to the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusets, where it will run from November 9, 2103 to February 17, 2014.

There is a book accompanying the exhibition, Impressionists on the Water. I haven’t seen it, but there is a review here.

[Via Fine Art Connoisseur]

 
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Kristina Nguyen

Kristina Nguyen
Kristina Nguyen is a visual development artist for the entertainment industry.

Nguyen studied at the Art Center College of Design and is now woking with Rooster Teeth, designing environments for projects that include the Web series RWBY.

Nguyen’s website portfolio is not extensive, but it includes concept designs for an unspecified project in which she demonstrates a wonderful 60’s Modern Retro-Future design sense.

You can see some older and personal work on her portfolio on artworkfolio.com.

[Via Concept Art World]

 
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Double Degas Eye Candy for Today

The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, and Édouard Manet, Seated, Holding His Hat, Edgar Degas
The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, and Édouard Manet, Seated, Holding His Hat, Edgar Degas

Degas was restless experimenter. In his depiction of a ballet rehearsal (for which Degas himself “rehearsed” with a number of preparatory drawings, and finished in three different versions) he is experimenting both with composition, as he frequently did, and with his materials — working over a pen and ink drawing on paper with thinned oil paint, pastel and a little bit of watercolor.

I love the depth he has given his composition, leading the eye from the back of the stage set through the groups of dancers and out to the tops of the cellos in the foreground, over which we are viewing the scene.

Though he is known primarily for his drawings in pastel, Degas’ graphite drawings are marvels of sensitive draftsmanship. His seemingly casual portrait of fellow artist Édouard Manet is one of my favorites.

Both works are in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Click the “Fullscreeen” link and then use th ezoom controls or download arrow for high resolution versions.

Today is Degas’ birthday.

 
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Stanislaw Zoladz

Stanislaw Zoladz
Stanislaw Zoladz is a watercolor painter originally from Poland, where he studied at the Kraków Academy of Fine Arts, now living and working in Stockholm, Sweden.

Zoladz’ beautifully refined paintings are infused with light in many forms, from scintillating daylight to the muted, atmospheric effects of overcast days.

From the relatively small images on his website, you might be inclined to categorize his work as hyper-realistic, or even photo-realistic, but in those few higher resolution images you can find online, it’s clear that his work, when viewed in more detail, retains the fresh immediacy of watercolor painting at its best.

This effect is exaggerated a bit by the fact that in much of his studio work, Zoladz works fairly large. He paints from life, and as far as I know does not rely on photographs for reference, creating his larger studio pieces from smaller location studies.

There are larger images reproduced on the site of Konsthuset Galleri. There is also an interview with Zoladz on the Art of Watercolor blog that includes a few images that are linked to larger versions.

In both of the sections of his website galleries, for originals and reproductions, it’s worth noting that there are additional pages linked from a row of numbers under the thumbnails, and the galleries are actually nicely extensive.

Zoladz is featured in the current issue of Art of Watercolor magazine (Summer 2013, n11).

I’ve listed what other resources I could find below.

[Suggestion courtesy of James Gurney]

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Isaac de Moucheron landscape drawing

Classical Landscape, Isaac de Moucheron
Classical Landscape, Isaac de Moucheron

In the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Click “Fullscreen” and then zoom or download arrow.

A beautiful drawing in the grand tradition of 17th century Dutch landscapes in pen and ink with washes. In this case, the artist has combined two ink colors, brown and gray-brown. The original measures roughly 7×12 inches (17.5×28.7cm).

De Moucheron combines precise draftsmanship and fluid, gestural pen marks with astonishing ease. He uses his washes to great effect in preserving the economy of line.

I love the raking light across the terrace walls, the depth achieved with both linear and atmospheric perspective, and the wonderful textural qualities his pen lines give the foliage.

How casual he makes it seem!

 
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