Those who are not conversant in works of art are often surprised at the high value set by connoisseurs on drawings which appear careless, and in every respect unfinished; but they are truly valuable... they give the idea of a whole.
- Sir Joshua Reynolds
We do not see things as they are, we see them as we are.
- Anais Nin
 

 

Friday, January 31, 2014

A few highlights from the 1660s

Posted by Charley Parker at 10:36 pm

1660s painting: Gerard Dou, Johannes Vermeer, Adriaen van Ostrade, Caesar van Everdingen, Ludolf Bakhuizen, Willem Kalf, Rembrandt van Rijn, Cornelis de Man, Edwaert Collier, Gabriel Metsu, Oieter de Hooch, Christoph Paudiss

Wikimedia Commons (see my Lines and Colors post here), the huge, mostly public domain image repository associated with Wikipedia, has a nice aspect to its organization that lets you view a broad variety of art organized by year, decade or century.

These are just a few paintings from the (apparently splendiferous) decade of the 1660s. As much as I love 19th century painting, I think I have to vote for the 17th century as the high water mark for the art of painting.

Here is the Wikimedia Commons page for 1660s paintings.

Unfortunately, like many (if not most) repositories of art images on the web, many of the images you encounter will have color that is way off (sometimes way way off) from the original painting. One thing about Wikimedia Commons, however, is that you will often see several different versions of the same image, with different color casts. (Hint: if the image of a painting from the 17th century has colors that look like they fell off an Impressionist’s palette, it’s a pretty good guess way off.)

See my similar Lines and Colors post on 1880s paintings from Wikimedia Commons.

(Images above: Gerard Dou, Johannes Vermeer, Adriaen van Ostrade, Caesar van Everdingen, Ludolf Bakhuizen, Willem Kalf, Rembrandt van Rijn, Cornelis de Man, Edwaert Collier, Gabriel Metsu, Oieter de Hooch, Christoph Paudiss)

4 comments for A few highlights from the 1660s »

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  1. Comment by Ælle
    Saturday, February 1, 2014 @ 4:37 am

    One priceless link is the following, also in English: http://explore.rkd.nl/nl/explore/images#filtersnaam=Ostade%2C+Adriaen+van
    Netherlands Institute for Art History http://explore.rkd.nl/en/

  2. Comment by Ælle
    Saturday, February 1, 2014 @ 4:43 am

    The RKD (Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie/Netherlands Institute for Art History) is one of the most important art-historical information centres in the world, administering a unique collection of documentary, library and archive material on Western art from the late Middle Ages to the present.

  3. Comment by David J Teter
    Saturday, February 1, 2014 @ 2:36 pm

    Great line-up. And I would have to second your vote on 17th century painting as the high watermark.
    Perhaps another subject for Answers.com

  4. Comment by Charley Parker
    Sunday, February 2, 2014 @ 12:53 am

    Thanks, David. Good thought.

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