Friday, October 24, 2014

Nicolas Delort (update)

Nicolas Delort, pen, ink and scratchboard illustration
Nicolas Delort is a Canadian/French illustrator who I wrote about in early 2013, and featured in the article on contemporary ink artists I wrote for the Spring 2014 issue of Drawing Magazine.

Since then, Delort has revised and updated his blog and website, adding a number of striking new images done in his beautiful ink and scratchboard style.

Among contemporary illustrators using scratchboard, Delort’s work stands out for its dramatic approach light and dark, made viscerally immediate by his adept use of texture. Delort employs his linear textures not only to suggest the character of surfaces, but to convey motion and lead your eye through the composition.

In the portfolio on his website, be sure to click through to the larger images to appreciate the textural character of the drawings, made even more compelling by the nature of scratchboard lines, different in their edges than those made with a pen (though I believe Delort combines some pen and ink with his scratchboard technique).

Scratchboard has wonderful qualities in common with both pen and ink drawing and traditional graphics processes, and Delort uses the range of the medium to advantage.

Delort’s approach shows an admiration for classic pen and ink illustrators like Franklin Booth, as well as the engravings of 19th century artists like Gustave Doré.

In addition to his website and blog, you can find examples of Delort’s work on his Behance portfolio, Tumblr and the site of his U.S. artists’ representatives, Shannon Associates.

There is an article on the making of the “It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown” image above, second pair down, on Blurppy.

There is a brief interview with Delort on YouTheDesigner, and another on Hypocrite Design.

 
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3 thoughts on “Nicolas Delort (update)

  1. Bill Carman

    He is one of those scratchboard artists whose work doesn’t feel techniquey. Not just. “It’s cool because it’s scratchboard,” but “It’s just great work and scratchboard happens to be the medium.” Really enjoy his stuff.

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