Lines and Colors art blog

Month: January 2015

  • Eye Candy for Today: Whistler’s Wapping

    Wapping on Thames, James McNeill Whistler In the national Gallery of Art, DC. The name refers to a rough and tumble dock area of the Thames River in London, where Whistler lived and worked for a time, though I think the location is actually a nearby inn rather than the artist’s studio. In a marked…

  • David Kassan (update)

    Despite having previously written about him in 2008 and again in 2010, I still struggled a bit in trying to describe David Kassan’s approach to his portrait and figurative work. He certainly doesn’t flatter his subject, but neither does his deliberately seek out the grotesque (as, say, Lucian Freud). Words like “honest” or “direct” don’t…

  • Valerio Fabbretti

    Originally from Italy and now living and working in San Francisco, where he studied at Academy of Art University, Valerio Fabbretti is a children’s book illustrator, concept artist and comics artist. Fabbretti brings to his work a lively, innocent style ideal for his subjects. There is little information on his website about materials, but it…

  • Eugène Galien Laloue

    Though others have taken on the style and subject matter over time — continuing to this day — there are four artists that I associate with a particular approach to painting the subject of Paris during the Belle Epoch (around the turn of the twentieth century): Luigi Loir, Edouard Leon Cortès; Eugène Galien Laloue and…

  • Eye Candy for Today: Théodore Chassériau pencil portrait

    Portrait of a Young Woman Wearing a Cloak and Bonnet, Théodore Chassériau In the Metropolitan Museum of Art; graphite on wove paper; approximately 18 x 15 in. (46 x 39 cm). Chassériau has given us a beautifully sensitive pencil portrait. The commentary on the museum’s website suggests that Chassériau shows more interest in the subject’s…

  • Alvin Richard

    Canadian artist Alvin Richard, who lives in the Atlantic provence of New Brunswick, works in acrylic on board when painting his crisp, light-filled still life compositions. Richard balances his precise draftsmanship with a sensitivity to the softness of edges and a nuanced feeling for the play of light, particularly through glass. This is especially evident…