Eye Candy for Today: Aegidius Sadeler rhino

Fable of the Rhinoceros and Elephants, Aegidius Sadeler, etching, Rijksmuseum
Fable of the Rhinoceros and Elephants, Aegidius Sadeler

Etching, roughly 3 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches (96x112mm), 1608. In the Rijksmuseum.

Today — I am informed in a tweet from the Rijksmusem — is World Rhino Day. In celebration they point to a selection of rhino images from their collection, from which I focused on this wonderful etching by Aegidius Sadeler.

Not only is the exotic beast made more so by Sadeler’s marvelously textural line work, the fairly-tale like elephants and elegantly rendered tree are a bonus.

 
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5 Replies to “Eye Candy for Today: Aegidius Sadeler rhino”

  1. If only artists would profile the rhino more in their work in order to trigger awareness of their beauty and vulnerability.
    South African conservationist Grant Fowlds, whose efforts include saving the rhinoceros from poachers and extinction, will speak at Virginia Commonwealth University on Monday, Sept. 28. South African conservationist Grant Fowlds, whose efforts include saving the rhinoceros from poachers and extinction, is shown with a baby chimp in the Congo saved from the bushmeat trade. Fowlds will speak at Virginia Commonwealth University on Monday, Sept. 28.
    The Extinction Wars
    Monday, 7 p.m., VCU’s Harris Hall Auditorium, 1015 Floyd Ave.

  2. If you get an old 1828 Noah Webster’s Dictionary, which is the very first edition dictionary that Webster came out with about 200 years ago, and look up the word “unicorn” it says:

    Unicorn – An animal with one horn; the monoceros. this name is often applied to the rhinoceros.

  3. The image of the Rhino is a copy of Albrecht Durer’s woodcut of the same subject. Durer’s woodcut was the only image of this exotic beast available at this time.

  4. note this Wikipedia entry on the subject. Durer’s image is facing right.
    Dürer’s Rhinoceros is the name commonly given to a woodcut executed by German painter and printmaker Albrecht Dürer in 1515.[1] The image was based on a written description and brief sketch by an unknown artist of an Indian rhinoceros that had arrived in Lisbon earlier that year. Dürer never saw the actual rhinoceros, which was the first living example seen in Europe since Roman times. In late 1515, the King of Portugal, Manuel I, sent the animal as a gift for Pope Leo X, but it died in a shipwreck off the coast of Italy in early 1516. A live rhinoceros was not seen again in Europe until a second specimen, named Abada, arrived from India at the court of Sebastian of Portugal in 1577, being later inherited by Philip II of Spain around 1580

  5. Dürer’s fanciful creation was so convincing that for the next 300 years European illustrators borrowed from his woodcut, even after they had seen living rhinoceroses without plates and scales.
    From the British Museum Research.

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