Eye Candy for Today: Cornelis Springer cathedral

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A Cathedral on a Townsquare in Summer, Cornelis Springer

I just love Springer’s atmospheric, textural cityscapes. As is often the case, this one is a tour-de-force in the use of value relationships to both suggest space and define the composition.

I find the contrast between the dark building in the left foreground and the almost ghostly tower particularly fascinating.

Cornelis inexorably moves our eye to the top of the tower by strengthening the value contrasts in comparison to the base. But even the base of the structure is pushed forward into the middle ground by the faded values of the distant street.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: John William North’s Spring

Spring, John William North
Spring, John William North

Watercolor and gouache on paper; roughly 11×17″ (29x43cm); in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The delicate value contrasts and stippled tones of North’s watercolor give a wonderful sense of those early spring days in which both the atmosphere and the land seem ripe with the promise of future change.

The wavering edges and placement of the blossoms on the tree to the right carry some of the feeling of Japanese woodblock prints.

 
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Finnian MacManus

Finnian MacManus
Originally from Chicago, Finnian MacManus is a concept artist based in Pasadena, CA. His clients include VSA Partners, Easley Dunne Games and Sony Santa Monica Studio.

MacManus works in a digital mixed-media approach, combining digital painting in Photoshop with CG modeling in Cinema 4D and Vue. He has a nice touch for creating environments and structures with an organic feeling, particularly in a series dealing with structures made from coral. He often renders these, and other subjects, in atmospheric hazes, imparting depth and mood.

He sometimes works collaboratively, and I have likely included some collaborative work here without having the time to list individual attributions.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: David Cox pencil drawing

Llanfair Church, North Wales for A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Water Colours, David Cox, graphite landscape drawing
Llanfair Church, North Wales for A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Water Colours, David Cox

Graphite and red chalk, roughly 6×16 inches (14x40cm).

Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project; downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons; original is in the Yale Center for British Art, which also has a downloadable file.

Victorian watercolorist David Cox gives us a beautiful example of the effective use of linear textures in graphite drawing. His thoughtful study of the stone building and its surrounds is rich with the tonal qualities of a painting.

You can see the titular book on the Internet Archive, in thumbnail page mode here.

 
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Tai-Shan Schierenberg

Tai-Shan Schierenberg
Tai-Shan Schierenberg’s intense, sometimes enigmatic portraits appear to be composed of rough-edged geometric chunks of color that one minute say “person”, and the next shout “paint!”

Schierenberg is an English painter based in London, whose work in in the National Portrait Gallery, London; and whose subjects include Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke of Edinburgh and physicist Stephen Hawking.

He also does wonderful landscapes, but his passion and focus is in portrature.

His handling of his subjects ranges from straightforward to semi-representational to conceptually challenging. I favor those works in which he finds an almost landscape-like monumentality in the shapes of the head and face, but cleaves more closely to the observation of the immediately seen.

Tai-Shan Schierenberg is on display in a solo exhibition at the Flowers Gallery in New York, that runs until April 2, 2016.

[Via Wil Freeborn]

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Joaquim Vayreda’s Beginning of Spring

The Beginning of Spring, Joaquim Vayreda
The Beginning of Spring, Joaquim Vayreda

Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project; downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons; original is in the Museu Nacional D’Art de Catalunya.

A wonderful painterly evocation of the cusp of Spring by Spanish painter Joaquim Vayreda, who painted in the Catalan region in Spain in the late 19th century.

Vayreda was the founder of the Olot school, a painting style focused on that area in the Catalan region and much influenced by the painters of the French Barbizon school.

 
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