Eye Candy for Today: Carl Larsson ink and watercolor

Carl Larsson, The Vderanda, from A Home - 26 watercolors, ink and watercolor
The Veranda. From A Home (26 watercolours), Carl Larsson

Ink and watercolor, roughly 13 x 17 inches (32 x 43 cm); in the collection of the Nationalmuseum, Stockholm (zoomable file); high resolution downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons.

This delightful pen and watercolor is part of a series of similar pieces that were intended to be published in reproduction as a book: A Home (26 watercolors).

The home represented was Larsson’s own. A variation of the book was later published by a German publisher as Das Haus in Der Sonne (A House in the Sun) to even great success.

This straightforward sunny view of the porch, nearby doghouse and its resident, embodies much of the charm of the undervalued technique of pen and watercolor, which combines the appeal of both drawing and painting.

This piece is also part of the cornucopia of high-resolution images recently contributed to Wikmedia Commons by the Nationalmuseum, as I described in my previous post. It’s available there for download in a version even larger than the detail crops I’ve shown above (direct link to high-res JPEG image here).

 
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3 Replies to “Eye Candy for Today: Carl Larsson ink and watercolor”

  1. For Carl Larsson no curtains in the windows, letting the light and sunshine in. He and his wife Karin were more or less interior designers of all times. Brilliant!

  2. Carl Larsson (1853-1919) was born into a poor family in Stockholm, Sweden. He was accepted to the Stockholm Academy of Fine Arts at the age of thirteen and spent several years working as a newspaper and magazine illustrator. He moved to Paris, where, as a penniless artist, he met his wife Karin, also an artist. In 1888 they moved back to Sundborn in Sweden. Carl Larsson is best known for his lovely watercolour paintings of his home and family which were popularised through a series of books.
    The couple had eight children.
    1. Suzanne (1884–1958) 2. Ulf. (1887–1905)
    3. Pontus (1888–1984) 4. Lisbeth (1891–1979)
    5. Britta (1893–1982) 6. Matts (1894–1895)
    7. Kersti (1896–1975) 8. Esbjörn (1900–1937)

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