Igor Sava

Igor Sava, watercolor cityscape Italy
Originally from Kotovsk, Russia, and now based in Rome, Igor Sava is a watercolor painter who focuses on cityscapes in his adopted country.

Sava’s approach combines deft control of edges with the visual charm of freely mixed washes. His architectural subjects carry a feeling of atmosphere and light, as well as the textures of their materials.

On his website, you will find a gallery of paintings, as well as smaller galleries of watercolor figure sketches and imaginative subjects.

There is a brief YouTube video of Sava painting at the 2016 International Watercolor Society Biennial.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Silvered Brook by John Fabian Carlson

Silvered Brook by John Fabian Carlson
Silvered Brook, John Fabian Carlson

Link is to file page on Wikimedia Commons; I don’t know the status of the original.

Swedish-American painter John Fabian Carlson was noted for his scenes of winter woods.

I love the way he finds so much variation of color in his tree trunks, while maintaining their coherence as an object with careful control of value.

 
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Phillip R. Jackson

Phillip R. Jackson, still life painting
Phillip Jackson is a still life painter based in Mississippi, where he is an Associate Professor of Art at the University of Mississippi in Oxford.

Among other training, Jackson studied with painting professor Dennis Wojtkiewicz at Bowling Green State University. (See my previous posts on Dennis Wojtkiewicz.)

Some of Jackson’s paintings take a straightforward but incisive approach to the representation of still life subjects; others have a mysterious, ephemeral quality, conveyed by his use of translucent layering and reflections.

In these, he seems to suggest layers of time, as though his subjects had been changed over time and his painting captured the changes.

In both approaches, he has a keen fascination with form as revealed by light, often dramatically horizontal and casting long shadows across reflective surfaces.

There is an interview from 2016 with Jackson on Huffington Post, and another from 2007 on Artists Network.

http://www.p-jackson.com

Portfolio & Bio at University of Mississippi in Oxford

Huffington Post

Artists Network

 
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Boris Arkadievich Diodorov

Boris Arkadievich Diodorov, childrens book illustration, Hans Christian Anderson, The Little Mermaid, The Snow Queen, Vinni-Pukh
Boris Diodorov is a Russian illustrator known for his popular interpretations of classics, particularly works by Hans Christian Anderson like The Snow Queen And The Little Mermaid. He is also known for his illustrations for “Vinni-Pukh”, Boris Zakhoder’s translated version of “Winnie the Pooh”.

Diodorov’s illustrations have a nice feeling reminiscent of the turn of the century “Golden Age” illustrators.

I can’t find a dedicated website for Diodorov, so I’ve linked to other articles and postings that showcase his work.

 
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Eye candy for Today: Edward Redfield’s Winter in the Valley

Winter in the Valley, Edward Willis Redfield
Winter in the Valley, Edward Willis Redfield

Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project; original is in the Reading Public Museum. There is a downloadable version here, part of this article about a previous traveling show that featured the painting, but it seems overly saturated, I’ve color corrected that image for the images above to be closer to the museum’s version.

Edward Redfield — one of the turn of the century American painters known as the “Pennsylvania Impressionists” — was noted for his winter scenes. He often captured these on location in a single session, sometimes in extreme temperatures and winds that required him to lash his large canvas to a tree to continue painting.

Here, he presents a quiet sunlit winter’s day scene of a farmhouse in the Delaware River valley, with small communities flanking the river seen through the trees.

Redfield’s canvasses are a delight in person, their surfaces so thick with his paint strokes, you wonder how they can hold that much paint.

 
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