Allen Douglas (update)

Allen Douglas, Cryptid Visions, fantasy illustration

Allen Douglas, Cryptid Visions, fantasy illustration

Allen Douglas is a painter and illustrator whose work I featured back in 2011. As an illustrator, his clients include Penguin, Putnam, Tor, Berkley, Random House, Scholastic, HarperCollins, Harcourt, Little Brown, Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, and Wizards of the Coast.

Since my previous post, Douglas has initiated a new series of works under the banner of “Cryptid Visions”. “Cryptid” refers to animals whose existence is in question. Douglas has taken flights of fancy that combine one species with another, juxtapose size relationships and delve into dragons and other mythical beasts.

Among the works on his Cryptid Visions website, you can also find a few straightforwardly naturalistic paintings of birds. On that site, you can also find a selection of prints and original paintings.

You can find more of his illustration work on his ArtStationand deviantArt portfolios, as well as on the site of his artist representatives, Shannon Associates, and Kid Shannon.

See also my previous post on Allen Douglas.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Franklin Booth pen and ink advertising illustration

Franklin Booth pen and ink advertising illustration

Franklin Booth pen and ink advertising illustration
Ad for Etsy Organ in House and Garden, Franklin Booth

American artist Franklin Booth, who was active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, was known for his marvelously intricate pen and ink illustrations, a style that came largely from the young artist confusing images in magazines that were done in wood engraving with pen and ink drawings.

Here, he pulls out the stops (oh, how I delight in that pun) in his illustration for organ manufacturer Etsy Organ, printed in House and Garden magazine in 1922.

Booth has created a stunningly beautiful fantasy of the music that will come from the organ — with lines that follow both the volume of the forms and the direction of movement and action. I love the swirls in the hair and the sheen of the draperies.

In addition, all of this modeling and rendering is done at an entire level of values that separates the cloud of imaginings from the darker rendering of the “reality” of the woman and the organ!

Wow.

 
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Sylvain Sarrailh

Sylvain Sarrailh, concept art, environments, illustration

Sylvain Sarrailh, concept art, environments, illustration

Sylvain Sarrailh is a French illustrator, concept artist and environment designer working primarily in the gaming field. He has worked with companies like Guerrilla Games, Illumination Entertainment, Rocksteady, Amplitude, Sony Picture Animation, Ubi Soft and Dreamworks.

Given the dark and grungy vein of illustration common within that industry, Sarrailh (who also goes by the handle “Tohad”) has an unusually bright and often naturalistic approach.

He has recently become the director and designer of a new game project, Forest of Liars, and he points to the painters of the Hudson River School of painting as inspiration for his approach to the illustrations for that game’s environments.

His ArtStation portfolio can be sorted to feature that project as well as other genres in which he works. There is an ArtStation blog with updates. You can also find his work on Behance and deviantART.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Charles Gifford Dyer still life

Seventeenth-Century Interior, Charles Gifford Dyer

Seventeenth-Century Interior, Charles Gifford Dyer (details)

Seventeenth-Century Interior, Charles Gifford Dyer

Oil on canvas, roughly 37 x 28 inches (94 x 71 cm), in the collection of the Art Institute Chicago

This is a nineteenth century American artist painting a still life in the manner of seventeenth century Dutch still life — and doing a bang up job of it.

 
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José Naranja

Jose Naranja, illustrated notebooks and journals

Jose Naranja, illustrated notebooks and journals

Among followers of “urban sketching”, there is an often associated practice known as “journaling”, or the keeping of a visual diary of one’s travels, day to day activities or random thoughts and ideas.

The idea of visual journals or diaries is nothing new, of course, but the current popularity of the practice, and the ability to place one’s journals online and compare notes with others, makes it an interesting contemporary phenomenon.

José Naranja is a Spanish artist, writer, traveller and observer who takes this activity to greater lengths than most. Naranja refers to himself as a “notebook maker and more”.

After years of making journals in commercial sketchbooks and notebooks, he has taken to crafting his own, using high quality paper and binding the in leather in much thicker dimensions than those commercially available.

These he fills with ink and watercolor sketches, hand written text, clippings, stamps and sometimes intricate design work — resulting in an amalgam that is part travel journal, part art and design experiments, part comparisons of drawing and writing materials, part collage, part scrapbook and part imaginative workspace.

You can find examples of his notebook pages and materials on his blog and Instagram page. He offers a facsimile edition of some of his selected pages as The Orange Manuscript, as well as prints.

You can also find quick overviews of some of his pages in articles on My Modern Met and Colossal. There is an interview with Naranja on Notebook Stories.

[Via Metafilter]

 
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Adam Oehlers

Adam Oehlers illustration

Adam Oehlers illustration

Adam Oehlers is a British illustrator, concept artist and character designer whose work carries a feeling of his admiration for the Golden Age illustrators.

Most of the illustration on his website is in a fantasy vein, with wonderfully rendered forest scenes, animals and plant details. He makes effective use of muted, limited palettes, giving the work a coherence and sense of subtlety.

I particularly enjoy his use of repeated natural forms, like leaves, tree trunks or butterflies, as components of suggested patterns, with a bit of an Art Nouveau sensibility.

In addition to illustration, you can find on his blog examples of animated music videos, as well as both prints and original art for sale in his shop.

You can also find additional examples of his work on Behance and Instagram.

 
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