Category Archives: Digital Art

Ben Haggett

Ben Haggett
Ben Haggett is a painter from Montana, who also happens to make some of the best and most cleverly designed pochade boxes out there, under the name of Alla Prima Pochade (as I described in my extensive article on pochade boxes).

Somewhat ironically, Haggett has in recent years become fascinated with digital painting, working in Artrage on an iPad (images above, top five paintings). Haggett still also works in traditional media, like oil (above, bottom four paintings).

Both his traditional and digital work has a textural, painterly surface quality, with bright, freely applied colors. Not only is the “painterly” quality of the digital work fascinating, so is the continuity of approach in his digital and traditional media work.

Haggett’s blog features both kinds of paintings, and also has some photos of the clever pochade-box-like holder he has created for doing digital iPad painting en plein air (above, bottom photo).

 
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Android Jones (update)

Android Jones
Andrew “Android” Jones has worked as a concept artist with companies like ILM and Nintendo, as well as Massive Black, which he co-founded. He was also co-founder of the popular ConceptArt.org community portal.

Jones is also a creator of visionary art, using a variety of digital tools involving digital painting, vectors and CGI modeling. He lists his primary tools as Painter, Photoshop, ZBrush and Alchemy.

He brings his skills in these areas to bear in complex, fascinatingly detailed visionary images — rich with patterns, textures, and imagery within imagery. These sometimes are stand alone pieces and sometimes serve as posters or music CD covers.

I particularly enjoy his blending of vector graphics and digital painting techniques, and his use of layered, almost fractal, repetition of design elements within the composition. He also uses digital blending modes to great effect, allowing his patterns and textures to be expressed against his painted forms.

The home page of his website serves as a blog and gallery of his latest work. There is also a portfolio section, a dedicated section for his Phadroid performance art projects and a store, which contains additional images not found in the other sections.

You can also find his work in the D’artiste: Concept Art collection

 
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Secrets of Corel Painter Experts

Secrets of Corel Painter Experts: Andreas Rocha [main cover image], Waheed Nasir, Wonman Kim, Brian Haberlin, Benjamin, Thorston Wolber [2 images], Chet Phillips, Mike Thompson, Dwane Vance, John Derry, Pete Revonkorpi
Among artists who work in the medium of digital painting, most notably visual development artists, comic book artists and illustrators, the two most popular applications for painting and drawing directly on the computer with a ressure-sensitive stylus and tablet are Adobe Photoshop and Corel Painter.

Photoshop, because of it’s much broader range of use in photo manipulation, compositing and prepress, is the subject of far more instructional material than Painter, which is much more focused on the direct creation of digital art. Those of us who love to work in Painter are always interested to see books on the subject, and are always hoping for a greater range of instructional topics and approaches.

Secrets of Corel Painter Experts by Daryl Wise and Linda Hellfritsch is a welcome addition to that list.

The book is subtitled “Tips, Techniques, and Insights for Users of All Abilities”, but I think it’s best suited for those who already have a grasp of Painter basics and are looking to take their skills to a more advanced level.

The book calls on a range of digital artists who are working in Painter and are recognized for their expertise in their field. Each chapter in the book is devoted to one of the 17 artists and focuses on an aspect of Painter techniques in which they are proficient.

Each artist is profiled, with background on their work and influences and a brief question and answer, as well as relevant links. The main feature is a step by step instruction on the technique or process that particular artist has been called on to demonstrate, along with a gallery of the artist’s work.

In addition, the artists also frequently contribute more general tips about their Painter working process.

Many of the artists included are familiar names in digital painting circles, drawn from the fields of comic art, illustration and concept art, as well as fine art and photography, and include John Derry, one of the original team that worked to develop Painter in its early stages at Fractal Design.

The accompanying DVD is a bit less that I might have hoped for, with mostly mid-resolution and a few high resolution images of the artists’ work, but not conveniently arranged for browsing. It is nice, however, that the DVD sections for each artist include clickable versions of their “Favorite websites” links from the book.

Corel Painter is a very powerful and flexible application, and can also be complex and somewhat daunting, with over 900 brushes by someone’s count and numerous other tools and settings. Secrets of Corel Painter Experts is not meant to be a comprehensive manual, but a focused series of instructions on specific techniques from working professionals.

(Images above, Andreas Rocha [main cover image], Waheed Nasir, Wonman Kim, Brian Haberlin, Benjamin, Thorston Wolber [2 images], Chet Phillips, Mike Thompson, Dwane Vance, John Derry, Pete Revonkorpi)

 
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Selected (Mike Guppy)

Selected (Mike Guppy)
another sight is a website on which artist and designer Mike Guppy displays a series of short art pieces, most using animated gifs, JavaScript, CSS and other web based techniques.

Of them, the one I find most interesting is Selected ~ 2011, a series of animated GIF images in which familiar artworks by Botticelli, Leonardo, Magritte, Munch and Fuselli are represented with with principle elements missing; their formerly occupied space represented in the image by an animation of a selection marquee (sometimes known as “marching ants”), as found in image editors like Photoshop, Fireworks, GIMP and others.

The image above, and detail below it, are still screenshots of the animated image.

When viewing the gallery for Selected, be aware that all of the pieces are on the same page, but arranged horizontally, requiring the use of a horizontal scrollbar at bottom to view them.

Guppy also has a blog, More Sight on which some of the pieces appear.

[Via BoingBoing]

 
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Benoît Mandelbrot, 1924 – 2010


As I described in my post about him from 2008, Benoît Mandelbrot was not an artist, but a mathematician.

His work, however, has enabled others, from dedicated computer artists to dabblers, to create the multitude of stunning images we know as ‘fractals”. In the process, he deepened our understanding of nature and the concept of infinity.

Benoît Mandelbrot died this morning at the age of 86.

There is a bio on Wikipedia, from which the images above were taken. They are part of a set of images in which each is a magnified crop from the last (I’ve skipped some in the sequence above).

For more, see my previous post on Benoit Mandelbrot, in which I give a better overview of Mandelbrot and his contribution, a brief explanation of fractals and links to images and other resources.

[Via Kottke]

 
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Danny van Ryswyk

Danny van Ryswyk
Danny van Ryswyk is an artist from the Netherlands.

When I originally wrote this post he was painting high-chroma, detailed still life subjects using the techniques of the Dutch masters, painting on mahogany wood panels.

In an interesting turn of artistic direction, he is now working in monochromatic digital media in the vein of pop surrealism, using 21st century tech to evoke a feeling of 19th century photography.

The pieces on his blog, of which he is offering limited edition giclée prints, are not yet extensive in number but will undoubtedly be added to over time.

(Note: some pieces should be considered NSFW.)

[Post edited July, 2012]

 
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