Frederico Zuccaro brown ink drawing of his brother drawing antique sculptures

Taddeo Drawing after the Antique; In the Background Copying a Facade by Polidoro, Frederico Zuccaro brown ink drawing of his brother drawing antique sculptures
Taddeo Drawing after the Antique; In the Background Copying a Facade by Polidoro, Federico Zuccaro

Pen and brown ink, brush with brown wash, roughly 17 x 7 inches (42 x 18 cm); in the collection of the Getty Museum, which has both a zoomable and downloadable version of the image.

There is also a somewhat warmer (more reddish brown) reproduction of the drawing available as a zoomable image on the Google Art Project, and a downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons.

It is the second, warmer version of the image that I’ve used above. Not having see the original, I don’t know which is more accurate (museums are not always accurate in the posting of images of work in their collections), so I’ve simply gone with the version I like better.

This is another in a wonderful series of drawings by 16th century artist Frederico Zuccaro of his elder brother Taddeo drawing from ancient statues in Rome. This was common practice in the way that artists trained, and continues to this day in those art schools and ateliers that hew to the classic or academic training the preceded the advent of modernist doctrine.

I’ve previously featured two other drawings from this series, here and here, also from the collection of the Getty Museum.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Watteau chalk studies

Two Studies of the Head and Shoulders of a Little Girl, Antoine Watteau, trois crayon drawing, black, red and white chalk on buff paper
Two Studies of the Head and Shoulders of a Little Girl, Antoine Watteau

Black, red and white chalk on buff paper, roughy 7 x 10 inches (19 x 25 cm); in the collection of the Morgan Library and Museum. Use the Zoom feature or download link.

Watteau was noted for his “trois crayon” drawings, in which black, red and white chalks are used on toned paper, usually buff or cream, to great effect in quickly rendering figures or faces.

Here, he has succinctly captured the likeness of his subject with gestural lines, a bit of hatching for shading and some quickly noted white highlights. For all of their simplicity, the drawings have a remarkable presence.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Rembrandt pen drawing of cottage and fence

Cottage with White Paling among Trees, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, ink and wash
Cottage with White Paling among Trees, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Drawing in quill and reed pen in brown ink with brown wash and touches of opaque white and gray wash; roughly 7 x 10 inches (17 x 25 cm); in the collection of the Rijksmuseum. Image is zoomable on their page, you can also download it with the creation of a free “Rijksstudio” account.

The Rijksmuseum describes the gray wash as being added later, along with the framing line. I suspect the opaque white may have been added by a later hand as well, all in an effort to make the drawing more of a salable piece somewhere along the way, but the nature of the original shines through.

I just love Rembrandt’s landscape drawings, and my impression of them has always been that he drew them for his own pleasure, and not as presentation pieces.

Look at the beautiful way his seemingly casual lines indicating the foliage not only give the masses shape and texture, but a sense of motion as well, as if being stirred by wind across the landscape.

The little details like the hay wagon and the man sitting at the edge of the water give the drawing additional life and a sense of place.

The slats of the fence (the “white paling” of the title assigned to the drawing) are a visual treat, their thickly delineated rough edges contrasted by thinner strokes suggesting the wood’s weathered texture. The fence slats, along with some of the shapes of the foliage behind it, are beautifully set off by the tone applied to the cottage and the darker foliage.

Look at the quick indications of flowers in front of the fence — this isn’t just a building, it’s someone’s home.

The reflections in the pond-like depression in front of the fence and the soft indication of the larger body of water and shore and buildings beyond are marvels of suggestion.

I don’t know anyone, with the possible exception of Shakespeare, who can say so much in so few lines.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Jean-Baptiste Le Prince ink and wash drawing

Imaginary Landscape with Fishermen Pulling in Their Nets, Jean-Baptiste Le Prince ink and wash drawing
Imaginary Landscape with Fishermen Pulling in Their Nets, Jean-Baptiste Le Prince

Pen and black ink with gray wash, roughly 16 x 12 inches (40 x 29 cm); in the collection of the Morgan Library and Museum, NY; use the Download or Zoom links on their page.

Though described as an imaginary landscape, both the landscape elements and the confidently rendered figures have a relaxed naturalism. I like the depth the artist has created with lighter values of wash.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Theodore Rousseau pen and wash drawing

Village and Church of Beurre, Franche-Comte, Theodore Rousseau
Village and Church of Beurre, Franche-Comté, Théodore Rousseau

Pen and brown ink, with brown wash and touches of green and red-brown watercolor, over graphite; roughly 7 x 10 inches (17 x 26 cm); in the collection of the Morgan Library and Museum, which has both a zoomable and downloadable version.

19th century landscape painter Théodore Rousseau, one of the key figures in the Barbizon School, here portrays a charming scene of the French village of Beurre, near the border with Switzerland.

Rousseau has captured the trees and buildings with quick, gestural pen strokes, filled in with loosely applied touches of tone. I get an impression of him sitting at the edge of the road, taking in the full essence of the scene and its key value relationships with the most economical notation at his command.

I love the way he has suggested the nature of the shallow water in the foreground without laboring over the usual visual clues of reflections and downward strokes. He simply noted it as he saw it — the reflections mere scribbles with splashes of tone — but his grasp of the immediate appearance of the area reads true as water.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Franz Xaver Winterhalter pencil portrait

Portrait of Baroness Gudin, nee Margareth Louis Hay, Franz Xaver Winterhalter, pencil portrait
Portrait of Baroness Gudin, née Margareth Louis Hay, Franz Xaver Winterhalter

Graphite, roughly 15 x 11 (40 x 29 cm); in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In this deceptively simple, sensitively realized pencil portrait, 19th century German painter Franz Xaver Winterhalter has given particular attention to nuances of value changes in the shadowed side of the face. These are actually easier to see at first in the smaller reproductions; you can then identify them in the closer crops.

Specifically, I admire his handling of the uplighting under the woman’s chin, and to a reduced extent, on her cheek — contrasted with the darker plane of the top of the cheek between the eye and the nose. The light picks up in the indentation at the side of the mouth, and again above the eye.

Also particularly appealing are the soft edges and close value relationships in the rendering of the lips and nose, where the artist has resisted the temptation to push the dark contrasts in these areas.

In the closer views, Winterhalter’s deft, confident application of tone appears to reflect a degree of tooth in the paper.

 
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