Eye Candy for Today: Lars Hertervig landscape

The Tarn, Lars Hertervig, oil on canvas, roughly 25 x 18 inches (63 x 46 cm); link is to zoomable image on Google Art Project; downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons, original is in the National Museum, Oslo.

19th century Norwegian painter Lars Hertervig portrays the landscape surrouding a “tarn” (a glacially formed lake) in a manner somewhere between realism and fantastical art.

His spooky, atmospheric presentation of the landscape makes it look almost primordial.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Waterhouse’s Mariana in the South

Mariana in the South, John William Waterhouse

Mariana in the South (details), John William Waterhouse

Mariana in the South, John William Waterhouse; oil on canvas, roughly 45 x 29 inches (114 x 74 cm); link is to Wikimedia Commons, original is in a private collection.

John William Waterhouse — who is often described as a Pre-Raphaelite painter, but might be more accurately, if awkwardly, classified as a Post Pre-Raphaelite — depicts a scene from the poem “Mariana” by Alfred Tennyson.

The Pre-Raphaelites and others in their circle often took scenes from literature as their subjects. This one, showing a despondent Mariana wishing for the return of a lover who has rejected her affection, can be contrasted with this interpretation of Mariana from Pre-Raphaelite painter John Everett Millais.

On the surface, Waterhouse appears to share the Pre-Raphaelites’ fascination with truth to the appearance of nature, but on closer inspection, his handling is broader and more painterly.

Here, he makes a striking contrast in the brighter values of the young woman’s face, hands and gown with the dimness of the hall behind her, set off with the light through the door at its end. This effect is carried back to the reflection of the door’s window in the upper part of the mirror.

In a closer look, the splashes of high-chroma red in her lips and in the flower in her bodice as seen in the mirror capture our eye. Again, there is an echo of this, a slight indication of both her red lips and an edge of the flower can be seen in the main figure. There is also a touch of red in the letter on the floor by her knees.

Waterhouse has not taken the easy way out in representing the perspective of the tiles the hall, turning them at an angle oblique to that of the walls of the hall.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor

Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor, Autumn in a Japanese Village

Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor, Autumn in a Japanese Village (details)

Autumn in a Japanese Village, Hiroshi Yoshida; watercolor on paper, roughly 13 x 20 in. (33 x 50 cm); link to image is on Ukiyo-e Search; I don’t know the location of the original.

Hiroshi Yoshida was a Japanese artist active the early to mid 20th century. He is known primarily for his extraordinarily beautiful woodblock prints in the shin-hanga style that show his affection for both the traditions of both Japanese and Western art.

It is much less often the we see examples of his direct watercolor paintings. In this wonderful example, he takes advantage of atmospheric and textural effects that are difficult to achieve in woodblock printing.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Henry La Thangue’s Ligurian Roses

Ligurian Roses, Henry Herbert La Thangue

Ligurian Roses, Henry Herbert La Thangue (details)

Ligurian Roses, Henry Herbert La Thangue; oil on canvas, roughly 41 x 28 in. (105 x 96 cm), link is to Sotheby’s auction in 2011. I’m assuming the current location of the original is a private collection.

Henry La Thangue was an English painter, active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who was influenced by the Barbizon School and the naturalism of Jules-Bastien Le Page.

I love the dappled light, subtle shadowed color and painterly brush mark in this scene. I find it interesting that the artist, in naming the work, considered the flowers the primary subject rather than the figure.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Sunny Autumn Day by George Inness

Sunny Autumn Day by George Inness

Sunny Autumn Day by George Inness (details)

Sunny Autumn Day by George Inness

Oil on canvas, approximately 32 x 42 in. (81 x 106 cm). Link is to the Cleveland Museum of Art, which has the original in its collection and offers both a zoomable and downloadable version of the image.

It’s easy to see the visual drama of the light and dark areas of the composition, but like may of Inness’ paintings from this period of his career, an important part of the magic is in the relationship of the soft and hard edges.

Happy Autumnal Equinox!

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Julian Onderdonk landscape

Late Afternoon, Julian Onderdonk

Late Afternoon, Julian Onderdonk

Late Afternoon, Julian Onderdonk

The link is to the image page on WikiArt, which unfortunately doesn’t have much information about the size or location of the original. If you click on “View all sizes” under the image on their page, you can access a reasonably high res version of the image. Presumably, this is oil on canvas.

Texas painter Robert Julian Onderdonk, who was active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, is considered an “American Impressionist”, and in known in particular for his landscapes featuring fields of Texas Bluebonnet flowers.

Here, his subject is less colorful and more prosaic, but, even though I’ve only see it in reproduction, I just love this painting. Onderdonk’s seemingly casual brush work is so delightfully brushy and textural, the usual adjective of “painterly” seems insufficient.

 
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