Eye Candy for Today: Albert Anker still life with Coffee and Potatoes

Albert Anker - Stilleben, Kaffee und Kartoffeln, Still life with Coffee and Poratoes

Albert Anker - Stilleben, Kaffee und Kartoffeln, Still life with Coffee and Poratoes (details)

Stilleben, Kaffee und Kartoffeln (Still life with Coffee and Poratoes), Albert Anker

Link is to Wikimedia Commons page with high-res image.

This domestic still life by 19th century Swiss artist Albert Anker at first looks smoothly refined, but on closer inspection reveals itself to be quite painterly.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Samuel Prout pencil drawing

The Castle at Heidelberg, Samuel Prout pencil drawing

The Castle at Heidelberg, Samuel Prout pencil drawing (details)

The Castle at Heidelberg, Samuel Prout

Pencil on paper, roughly 11 x 16″ (28 x 43 cm); in the collection of the Morgan Library and Museum.

19th century artist Samuel Prout give us one of those wonderful drawings that is simultaneously loose and precise, and shows us something of the process of its creation in the more lightly rendered left side of the castle’s facade.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Joaquim Vancells, “February”

February, Joaquim Vancells, landscape painting

February, Joaquim Vancells, landscape painting, details

February, Joaquim Vancells

Oil on canvas, roughly 40 x 60 inches (104 x 155 cm)

Link is to zoomable image on Google Art Project, downloadable version on Wikimedia Commons; original is in the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya.

Catalonian painter Joaquim Vancells invites us into a quiet forest landscape in the heart of winter. I like the way the details of sticks, leaves and undergrowth ground us in the environment, while the meandering path in center invites us farther into the misty depths of the woodland.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Paul Sandby gouache nocturne

Windsor Castle from Drachet Lane on a rejoicing night, gouache on paper by Paul Sandby

Windsor Castle from Drachet Lane on a rejoicing night, gouache on paper by Paul Sandby (details)

Windsor Castle from Drachet Lane on a rejoicing night, Paul Sandby

Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project, downloadable version on Wikimedia Commons, original is in the Royal Collection Trust.

Gouache on paper, roughly 12 x 18 inches (31 x 46 cm).

The Google Art Project page has some interesting background on the painting.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Constable graphite drawing

View of Cat Hanger, John Constable landscape pencil drawing

View of Cat Hanger, John Constable landscape pencil drawing

View of Cat Hanger, John Constable

Graphite on paper, roughly 8 x 14″ (20 x35 cm), in the collection of the Morgan Library and Museum.

Drawn on two sheets of a sketchbook, this scene is of a farm on an estate in West Sussex, England. Constable’s nuanced command of tones and delicate indications of clouds and textures makes the drawing feel remarkably complete.

 
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J.C. Leyendecker cover illustration for American Weekly

Mommy Kissing Santa Claus, Cover illustration for American Weekly, December 19, 1948; J.C. Leyendecker

Mommy Kissing Santa Claus, Cover illustration for American Weekly, December 19, 1948; J.C. Leyendecker (details)

Cover illustration for American Weekly, December 19, 1948; J.C. Leyendecker

Link is to Heritage Auctions sold lots. Accessing the full high-res image requires a free account, but there is a somewhat smaller version on Tumblr here.

At first I thought that this was Leyendecker’s take on the popular song, “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus”, but the illustration was published in 1948, and the song was apparently first recorded and released in 1952.

Whether the magazine cover influenced the writing of the song is difficult to say, but it seems to me a likely scenario.

This feels like it was quickly realized by the standard of many of Leyendecker’s other illustrations, but is still shows his superb draftsmanship, and characteristic stylized fabric folds and rendering of hair.

 
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