Marc Dalessio (update 2024)

Oil paintings by Marc Dalessio
Oil paintings by Marc Dalessio

Marc Dalessio is a contemporary American painter whose work I have followed with interest for a number of years. I first wrote about him in 2009, and again in 2014. I’m long overdue to feature him again for perhaps a new group of readers.

Dalessio travels the world, painting and teaching, and his work captures the character, light and color of the places he visits with a keen eye to reducing what he sees to the essentials.

His work can currently be seen in a show at the Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor, NY from now until May 5, 2024.

Marc Dalessio is married to painter Tina Orsolic DaAlessio.

For more, see my previous posts on Marc Dalessio.

Grenning Gallery show to May 5, 2024
Grenning Gallery ongoing representation
Website
Flickr gallery
YouTube

George Clausen’s Day Dreams

Day Dreams, George Clausen, oil on canvas
Day Dreams, George Clausen, oil on canvas

Day Dreams, George Clausen, oil on canvas; roughly 27 x 60 inches (70 x 152 cm). Link is to the image file page on Wikimedia Commons. Their source is a 2007 Sotheby’s auction, so I assume the original is currenty in a private collection.

In this idyllic rural scene by the British painter George Clausen, we can see his admiration for the French painter Jules Bastien-Lepage who was roughly his contemporary. Both painters idealized the lives of farm workers; and both painted with a particularly subtle sensitivity to value relationships.

Laura Theresa Alma-Tadema

Laura Theresa Alma-Tadema Laura Theresa Alma-Tadema

Laura Theresa Alma-Tadema (née Epps) was a British painter active in the late 19th cenntury who was evidently fascinated with Dutch 17th century genre painting, notably the works of Vermeer and De Hooch.

She apparently did not have formal training and likely received most of her instruction from her husband, noted Victorian painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema, who she met when she was 17, and he an established artist at 33. Laura acted as a stepmother to Lawrence’s daughters, including Anna Alama-Tadema, who became a skilled painter in watercolor.

A few paintings from 1888

Charles Edward Perugini
A few paintings from 1888, Emil Zschimmer, Olga Boznańska, Peder Mork Monsted, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, John Singer Sargent, Vincent van Gogh, Joaquin Sorolla

Most of these were sourced from this page on Wikimedia Commons.

I think the late 19th and early 20th centuries produced an extraordinary bounty of wonderful paintings.

(Images above, links are to my articles: Charles Edward Perugini, Emil Zschimmer, Olga Boznańska, Peder Mørk Mønsted, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, John Singer Sargent, Vincent van Gogh, Joaquín Sorolla)

Eye Candy for Today: Whistler etching of Annie Haden

Annie Haden, James McNeill Whistler, drypoint etching

Annie Haden, James McNeill Whistler, drypoint etching

Annie Haden, James McNeill Whistler, drypoint, roughly 19 x 13 inches (35 x 21 cm).

This printing of the plate is in the Smithsonian National Museum of Asian Art, which has both a zoomable and downloadable version of the file. (The museum has a collection of Whistler’s work, presumably in his role as an American artist who took much interest in and inspiration from Asian art, design and culture.) I’ve taken the liberty of lightening the image somewhat, so you can see the details better.

This is one of several etchings and drypoints Whistler made of his neice, Annie Haden, at verious ages. This one is a particularly beautiful and extensively refined composition. Annie is posed rather formally in a long cape and skirt; her head is tilted and she looks directly at the viewer.

I suppose you could interpret her expression in several ways, one of which might be tired resignation at the boring task of posing, yet again, for her uncle.

The print is a good example of Whistler’s mastery of subtle drypoint linework.

Drypoint is a printmaking technique related to — and often combined with — etching, in which lines are incised directly into the plate with an etching needle, rather being etched into the plate with acid. This often leaves a burr of metal at the side of the incised line, giving the lines a soft, slightly rough feeling.

Ann Lofquist

Ann Lofquist
Ann Lofquist

Ann Lofquist is a Massachusssetts based painter who paints in oil, both plen air and studio works. She takes as her subjects streams, fields, farms, woods and at times mountains. These are often handled in a cinematic ratio or even more severly horizontal proportions.

I find her work particualry appealing for all of the factors I mention above. Her paintings have a distinct and naturalistic feeling of place, time, atmosphere and light.

I can’t find a dedicated website or blog for Lofquist, but her work can currently be seen in a solo show at the Gross McCleaf Gallery here in Philadelphia. The show is on display until until March 2nd, 2024.

This page has some background on the artist and some information about her process.

After the show, you should still be able to see images of her work on the gallery’s site as one of their regularly represented artists.

There is a very nice film about Lofquist and her work by Philadelphia filmmaker John Thornton on YouTube.

I’ve added what I can find of other gallery representation and a couple of interviews.