A list of art podcast lists

Art podcast lists, photo by Marco Verch

I haven’t listened to enough art podcasts to give many first hand reports, so I offer you a list of lists of art podcasts, many of which give good capsule descriptions of the podcasts.

Yes, there is a good bit of overlap between the lists, but you should be able to find something that suits you.

Personally, I’ve been listening to the Plein Air Podcast on Outdoor Painter while I paint. It features interviews with notable artists, as does The Artful Painter Podcast, which seems to be left off most lists for reasons that escape me.

 
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Guide to Virtual Museum Resources

The Museum Computer Network (MCN) has published a guide to online virtual museums and related resources: The Ultimate Guide to Virtual Museum Resources, E-Learning, and Online Collections, that should provide art lovers who are at home with time to browse a cornucopia of time sinks.

Divided into sections like “Portals”, “Virtual Tours / Online Exhibits”, “E-Learning”, “Online Collections” and “Digital Archives & Libraries”, the list of links is being updated on an ongoing basis.

(I’ll also point out that Lines and Colors has 15 years of archived posts, most of which contain multiple links to art resources. See the Categories or Archives links in the left hand column.)

Enjoy!

[Via Delaware Art Museum]

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Nicolas Poussin’s Landscape with a Calm

Landscape with a Calm, Nicolas Poussin

Landscape with a Calm, Nicolas Poussin, details

Landscape with a Calm, Nicolas Poussin, oil on canvas, roughly 38 x 51 inches (97 x 131 cm). Original is in the Getty Museum, which has both zoomable and downloadable versions of the image. There is also a zoomable version on Google Art Project and a downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons.

Among other subjects, French Baroque painter Nicolas Poussin — who spent most of his career in Rome and resisted the excesses of the Baroque style — painted landscapes in a dynamic but classically influenced style.

The title makes more sense when the painting is compared to its pendant counterpart, Landscape with a Storm, in the collection of the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Rouen.

Both deal with atmosphere, but in this case, the peaceful scene is more dramatic and engaging than that of the tempest.

 
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Monet’s Gare Saint-Lazare series

Monet's Gare Saint-Lazare series

Monet's Gare Saint-Lazare series

Claude Monet painted several series of paintings on particular subjects — like the haystack series, poplars, water lilies and the facade of the Rouen Cathedral — revisiting the same subject multiple times in different lighting and atmospheric conditions.

The first of these series was of the Gare Saint-Lazare, one the large railway terminals in Paris. He painted 12 paintings of the train shed interior, train yard and environs.

Much of his attention appeared to be on the clouds of steam from the locomotives, blending at times into the Paris sky.

Wikipedia has a convenient page devoted to the series, with images of all 12 paintings.

 
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Ada Florek

Ada Florek watercolor painting

Ada Florek watercolor painting

Originally from Poland, Ada Florek is a watercolor painter based in Thoiry, France.

Though she also paints other subjects, she focuses primarily on architectural and still life subjects.

I enjoy her textural approach and use of crisp edges.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Frits Thaulow, A stream in spring

Frits Thaulow, A stream in spring

Frits Thaulow, A stream in spring (details)

A stream in spring, Frits Thaulow, oil on panel, roughly 13 x 16 inches (32 x 40 cm)

Link is to Christie’s auction house, where the painting was sold at auction in 2011 (full size here). I don’t know the current location of the original, perhaps in a private collection.

19th century Norwegian painter Frits Thaulow is my favorite painter of small streams and rivers, and one of my favorite landscape painters in general.

I don’t think I’ve seen anyone capture the elements of surface character, reflection and objects under the water quite like Thaulow. For superb example of how he sometimes captures all three in one painting, see my Eye Candy post on Thaulow’s Water Mill.

 
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