Eye Candy for Today: Anders Zorn etched portrait of Augustus Saint Gaudens

Augustus Saint Gaudens II (Saint Gaudens and his Model), Anders Zorn, etching

Augustus Saint Gaudens II (Saint Gaudens and his Model), Anders Zorn, etching (details)
Augustus Saint Gaudens II (Saint Gaudens and his Model), Anders Zorn

Etching and drypoint, roughly 5 x 8 inches (14 x 20 cm); in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art; downloadable large image on Wikimedia Commons

Zorn is one of my favorite etchers (after only Rembrandt and Whistler), and his mastery shows here in his portrait of his friend, Irish/American sculptor Augustus Saint Gaudens.

In a tour-de-force of etching chiaroscuro, Saint Gaudens’ face is revealed in half light, and the figure of his model emerges gradually from the background darkness. Zorn’s seemingly casual lines sweep across the figures in sections that vary in direction and textural effect.

Zorn has not used aquatint here, the gray tones appear to be achieved by the way the print was inked and wiped.

For more, see my post on Anders Zorn’s etchings.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Emilio Sánchez-Perrier landscape

Boating on the River, Emilio Sanchez Perrier, landscape painting

Boating on the River, Emilio Sanchez Perrier, landscape painting (details)

Boating on the River, Emilio Sánchez-Perrier

Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project; downloadable image on Wikimedia Commons; original is in the Museo Carmen Thyssen Málaga, which also has zoomable & downloable images.

Sánchez-Perrier’s landscapes have a wonderful visual softness. They exhibit a masterful use of soft edges that is somehow different than that of Inness and the American Tonalists. For me, it creates a feeling of quiet and contemplation.

There appears to be a band of lighter color through the trees and bushes in the center of the image that corresponds roughly to the background color along the horizon. I don’t know if this is a pentimento or something else. The museum’s website doesn’t mention it.

For more, see my previous post on Emilio Sánchez-Perrier.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: The Obsequies of an Egyptian Cat, John Reinhard Weguelin

The Obsequies of an Egyptian Cat, John Reinhard Weguelin, 19th century Victorian painting

The Obsequies of an Egyptian Cat, John Reinhard Weguelin, 19th century Victorian painting (details)

The Obsequies of an Egyptian Cat, John Reinhard Weguelin

Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project; high-res downloadable image on Wikimedia Commons; original is in the Auckland Art Gallery.

Victorian art lovers were fascinated with ancient cultures and settings, particularly those of ancient Egypt, and this image of obsequies (funeral rites) for the mummy of a household cat fills the bill.

There are lots of appealing details in the vases stands and offerings, as well as the extensive set of hieroglyphs on the wall. I like the stairs, statuary and glimpse of daylight through the entrance at the upper right.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Christen Købke landscape

The Garden Steps Leading to the Artist's Studio on Blegdammen, Christen Kobke, oil painting on paper

The Garden Steps Leading to the Artist's Studio on Blegdammen, Christen Købke, oil painting on paper (details)

The Garden Steps Leading to the Artist’s Studio on Blegdammen, Christen Købke

Oil on paper laid on canvas, roughly 9 x 13 inches (22 x 33 cm). Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project; downloadable version on Wikimedia Commons; original is in the National Gallery of Denmark.

I love the odd angle at which he’s approached the building, the compressed indication of the sunlit side and the curve of the bush cradled in the curve of the stairs. There is just something pleasingly gestural about the whole painting, though it’s grounded in solid draftsmanship.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: The corner of the villa, by Edward John Poynter

The corner of the villa, by Edward John Poynter

The corner of the villa, by Edward John Poynter (details)

The corner of the villa, Edward John Poynter

Oil on canvas, roughly 24 x 24 inches (62 x 62 cm); link is to Wikimedia Commons; their image comes from a sale through Sotheby’s in 2007, so I assume the original is currently in a private collection.

In this finessed composition, Victorian era painter Edward Poynter give us luxuriously draped figures, a marbled and tiled interior, mosaics, a fountain, potted plants, elements of still life, and of course, birds.

 
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