Bror Anders Wikstrom

Bror Anders Wikstrom, imaginative float designs of dragons and other, in watercolor
With the exception of the more straightforward watercolor (images above, bottom), the rest of these wild and wonderfully realized watercolor illustrations are designs for New Orleans carnival parade floats from the early part of the 20th century by Swedish/American artist Bror Anders Wikstrom.

Wikstrom originally went to sea as a young man, but his career as a sailor was curtailed by changes in his eyesight. Nearsightedness did not prevent him from pursuing studies in art in Stockholm and Paris, and he applied his artistic learning to magazine illustrations, advertising design, prints, cartoons, murals and portraits.

Coming to the U.S., he settled in New Orleans and became noted for his designs for carnival floats for two of the prominent krews, Rex and Proteus.

A number of his float designs are maritime in nature, others are wilder fantasy, often featuring dragons and other fantastical creatures.

He also painted landscapes and marine paintings, though I can’t find as many examples of those; you can find some on Artnet and Invaluable (and here).

 
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Boris Arkadievich Diodorov

Boris Arkadievich Diodorov, childrens book illustration, Hans Christian Anderson, The Little Mermaid, The Snow Queen, Vinni-Pukh
Boris Diodorov is a Russian illustrator known for his popular interpretations of classics, particularly works by Hans Christian Anderson like The Snow Queen And The Little Mermaid. He is also known for his illustrations for “Vinni-Pukh”, Boris Zakhoder’s translated version of “Winnie the Pooh”.

Diodorov’s illustrations have a nice feeling reminiscent of the turn of the century “Golden Age” illustrators.

I can’t find a dedicated website for Diodorov, so I’ve linked to other articles and postings that showcase his work.

 
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Happy Leyendecker Baby New Year 2018!

Happy Leyendecker Baby New Year fro Lines and Colors
As I’ve done every December 31st for the last 12 years, I’ll wish Lines and Colors readers a Happy New Year with more of J.C. Leyendecker’s wonderful Saturday Evening Post New Years covers.

The brilliant American illustrator J.C. Leyendecker set our modern conception of representing the new year as a baby, with the use of a New Years baby to welcome in 1908 in the cover shown above, top. He continued the practice every year into the 1940s, usually incorporating topics of the day into his interpretation of the baby.

Here’s hoping you all have a great new year, filled with lots of fantastic art and inspiration!

-Charley

 
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James Niehues

James Niehues, hand painted aerial maps of ski resorts
James Niehues ia an artist based in Colorado who creates hand-painted aerial maps of ski resorts, golf resorts and other outdoor sporting sites.

He paints these at relatively large scale in gouache, using both brushes and airbrush, which allows him to give a high level of detail and texture to his largely mountainous scenes.

In the galleries on his website you will also find ski resorts in other parts of the US and internationally, as well as golf resorts. In addition, you will find aerial map views of mountain landscapes in warmer months and more traditional landscape views that he calls “scenic paintings”. (These are accessed from a not too obvious pop-out menu in the main navigation, or from a list in the page footer.)

Niehuse has a number of his images available as prints through ImageKind.

 
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Norman Rockwell Santa

And to All a Good Night, Norman Rockwell
And to All a Good Night, Norman Rockwell

This image is sourced from an interesting 2015 Wired article on Rockwell’s photographic reference for this and a number of his other holiday themed paintings.

As is often the case with Rockwell paintings, much of the charm for me is in the little touches — the position of the hand holding the pipe and the rendering of the wooden chair; but I also love the loose, cartoony feeling of the illustration overall, and that wonderful wide-eyed, frazzled expression on the face of the Jolly One.

Seems like it’s been that kind of year for many of us. Here’s hoping 2018 brings some relief (even if we have to wait for November).

Merry Christmas and Happy Other Holidays!

 
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