Gaby D’Alessandro

Gaby D'Alessandro, illustrations
Originally from the Dominican Republic and currently based in Brooklyn, Gaby D’Alessandro is an illustrator whose clients include The New York Times, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The National Audubon Society, NPR and The American Museum of Natural History.

D’Alessandro has a particular strength in her depictions of scientific concepts and historical figures. She contrasts straightforward portraits and faces, rendered with nuanced value changes, against patterns of biological and geometric forms — ideal in her presentation of figures like Darwin and a marvelous evocation of the intellectual/emotional sensation of listening to Bach’s tones and colors (images above, fourth down).

I particularly admire her portrait of pioneering coder and computer visionary Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (“Ada Lovelace”), set against a diagram of Babbage’s Difference Engine and enwrapped in strings of input punch cards for the machine (images above, bottom).

In addition to the images on her website, you can find more on her Behance portfolio and Instagram, and the portfolio of her U.S. artist’s representatives, Morgan Gaynin, There are available prints of her work on InPrint and society6.

 
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Matthieu Forichon

Matthieu Forichon, vector illustration
French illustrator Matthieu Forichon works in vector illustration, an approach that lends itself well to his crisp, elegant portrayals of fashion, travel, food and drink for clients like Louis Vuitton, Nespresso, Lillet, Camus cognacs & Neuhaus chocolates.

I find particular appeal in his use of dramatic lighting in interiors and Parisian night scenes.

Forichon’s website is in French, but easily navigated by non-French speakers. You may find it a bit easier, though, to browse through his work in the site of his artist’s representatives on Rapp Art.

You can find some of his more informal, sketch-like pieces on his Instagram feed.

 
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Bror Anders Wikstrom

Bror Anders Wikstrom, imaginative float designs of dragons and other, in watercolor
With the exception of the more straightforward watercolor (images above, bottom), the rest of these wild and wonderfully realized watercolor illustrations are designs for New Orleans carnival parade floats from the early part of the 20th century by Swedish/American artist Bror Anders Wikstrom.

Wikstrom originally went to sea as a young man, but his career as a sailor was curtailed by changes in his eyesight. Nearsightedness did not prevent him from pursuing studies in art in Stockholm and Paris, and he applied his artistic learning to magazine illustrations, advertising design, prints, cartoons, murals and portraits.

Coming to the U.S., he settled in New Orleans and became noted for his designs for carnival floats for two of the prominent krews, Rex and Proteus.

A number of his float designs are maritime in nature, others are wilder fantasy, often featuring dragons and other fantastical creatures.

He also painted landscapes and marine paintings, though I can’t find as many examples of those; you can find some on Artnet and Invaluable (and here).

 
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Boris Arkadievich Diodorov

Boris Arkadievich Diodorov, childrens book illustration, Hans Christian Anderson, The Little Mermaid, The Snow Queen, Vinni-Pukh
Boris Diodorov is a Russian illustrator known for his popular interpretations of classics, particularly works by Hans Christian Anderson like The Snow Queen And The Little Mermaid. He is also known for his illustrations for “Vinni-Pukh”, Boris Zakhoder’s translated version of “Winnie the Pooh”.

Diodorov’s illustrations have a nice feeling reminiscent of the turn of the century “Golden Age” illustrators.

I can’t find a dedicated website for Diodorov, so I’ve linked to other articles and postings that showcase his work.

 
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Happy Leyendecker Baby New Year 2018!

Happy Leyendecker Baby New Year fro Lines and Colors
As I’ve done every December 31st for the last 12 years, I’ll wish Lines and Colors readers a Happy New Year with more of J.C. Leyendecker’s wonderful Saturday Evening Post New Years covers.

The brilliant American illustrator J.C. Leyendecker set our modern conception of representing the new year as a baby, with the use of a New Years baby to welcome in 1908 in the cover shown above, top. He continued the practice every year into the 1940s, usually incorporating topics of the day into his interpretation of the baby.

Here’s hoping you all have a great new year, filled with lots of fantastic art and inspiration!

-Charley

 
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