Short Trip, Alexander Perrin

Short Trip, Alexander Perrin, interactive animation
Short Trip is a hand-drawn interactive animation by Alexander Perrin.

The author calls it an “interactive illustration”, and the drawings are done in pencil.

If you would like to be simply and delightfully amused for 5 or 10 minutes, turn your sound on, open your browser to full screen and play with it using the left and right arrow keys.

There is information about Perrin and the project here.

[Via Jason Kottke]

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Emily Hare

Emily Hare, illustrations, beasties and creatures
Emily Hare is a freelance illustrator based in the UK who has a wonderful knack for creating beasties and creatures.

These have a nicely strange charm, or a charming strangeness, or, well.. you get the idea.

Though she used to work digitally, she is now working in traditional media, primarily watercolor.

Among the items in her online shop, is the option to preorder her book, Strangehollow.

[Addendum: Creative Bloq has just added an article on Emily Hare’s creature design: How to design believable fantasy beasts.]

[Via Eric Orchard]

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Kadir Nelson

Kadir Nelson, illustration and gallery painting
Kadir Nelson is an illustrator and gallery artist whose style ranges from straightforward to engagingly stylized.

His illustration work includes a number of popular picture books as well as editorial work — including the 90th anniversary cover of The New Yorker. This featured a delightful updating of the magazine’s signature character, Eustace Tilly (images above, top).

Nelson commands a sophisticated, naturalistic rendering technique that he can bring to bear on both his realistic and more exaggerated figures and settings. He sets off his figures with a sense of the texture of their clothing and his use of highlighted planes on faces gives them a strong feeling of dimensionality.

In a number of his paintings, Nelson takes on the challenge of placing his subject dead center of his composition, relying on his skill for visual drama to avoid any sense of the image being static. This approach allows him to confront the viewer with a subject that faces them directly, essentially demanding an interaction and response.

There are prints and lithographs of his work available on his online store, along with a number of the picture books he has illustrated.

[Via Karin Jurick]

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

William Russell Flint

William Russell Flint, watercolors and illustrations
Originally from Scotland, William Russell Flint was an illustrator and watercolor painter who spent much of his career in London, and traveled and painted in France and Italy.

Flint’s illustrations of literary or mythological scenes, as well as Gilbert and Sullivan operas, have a nice quality of Golden Age illustration to them.

He is also noted for his numerous rather politely erotic watercolors of nude or semi-nude young women either posing or engaged in mundane activities, seemingly oblivious to being observed.

Most notable, however, are Flint’s more straightforward watercolors painted during his trips to France and Italy. These are often of architectural subjects, and at their best, have some of the color and clarity found in Sargent’s watercolors.

Among online resources for Flint’s work are a couple of long-established sources for signed and limited edition prints. sirwilliamrussellflintprints.co.uk appears to the the official source associated with the artist’s family, but russellflint.net has a number of zoomable or clickable images at higher resolution.

Wikipedia has a selection of Flint’s illustrations. There is a nice selection of illustrations, landscapes and other subjects on The Pictorial Arts blog (search links). There is also a post on Willaim Russell Flint’s watercolor technique, with a step-by-step description of his work on a specific painting.

There is a brief British Pathé video of Flint in his studio from 1956 (thanks to James Gurney for the tip).

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Woonyoung Jung

Woonyoung Jung, concspt art and illustration, Modern Witches, Athletics with Dinosaurs
Woonyoung Jung is a visual development artist with Dreamworks Animation, but most of his online presence is devoted to his personal work — in particular two delightful series.

One is “Young Witches”, in which young women in colorful — rather then dour black — witches hats are apparently on vacation or an extended road trip, accompanied by their cat familiars who occasionally photobomb the illustrations.

The other is “Athletics with Dinosaurs” in which dinosaurs, dressed appropriately, participate in athletic events with people.

Both series are rendered in a lively, colorful graphic style that has much of the charm of 2D animation drawing.

Jung has prints of some of his images available on Big Cartel.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Leo (L.J.) Jordaan

Leo (L.J.) Jordaan, anti-fascist art, andi-nazi art
Leo (L.J.) Jordaan was a Dutch anti-fascist artist and political cartoonist who was living and woking in Amsterdm at the time of the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands in 1940.

Prior to the invasion, Jordaan has been working for the magazine Green. The Nazi occupiers shut down the magazine, along with most of what could be called a free press — always an enemy to fascists — and Jordaan took his work to underground publications.

Jordaan had a powerful graphic style, emphasized by his use of both dark and light hatching. He showed the Nazis a bringers of death, terror and pestilence to his beloved Netherlands, and was particularly harsh on Dutch fascist sympathizers, who he portrayed as shooting loyal Dutch in the back.

His most famous image was “De Robot” (images above, third from the bottom), which portrayed the Nazi war machine as an unstoppable robot trampling Dutch soldiers beneath its metal boots. It was published in the underground newspaper De Groene Amsterdamme (“The Green Amsterdamer”) during the occupation.

His portrayal of Hitler as a brooding Lucifer (above, second from bottom) seems to give a nod to Gustave Doré’s image of the Ninth Circle of Hell. The image of Christ in thorns above him refers to an image I’ve seen before, but I don’t actually know its origin. It may be a Gothic or early Renaissance icon.

In the image above, bottom, we find Jordaan mocking the Nazis’ attempt to appropriate Dutch culture — and Rembrandt in particular — as part of “Aryan Heritage”.

Jordaan survived the occupation, and after the war became a noted film critic.

The best source for images of Jordaan’s work is the Illustration Art blog, which has comments under some of the images that put them in context. Also good is this post on Dr. Tenge whhich features large images.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin