Beleaguered Leyendecker Santa

J.C. Leyendecker Santa Claus Saturday Eevening Post cover
J.C. Leyendecker Santa Claus Saturday Eevening Post cover

Another wonderful Saturday Evening Post Santa Claus cover by the brilliant American illustrator J.C. Leyendecker, who I think played a major role in forming our modern image of the Jolly One.

Here, he is portrayed as not so jolly as he fends off the unwanted attention of the house’s stalwart defender, who apparently doesn’t recognize “Santa” under his costume and strap-on beard as he attempts to put up decorations.

This illustration from Leyendecker, who worked primarily in the early part of the 20th century was reprinted here on a 1993 issue. I don’t know the date of its original publication.

The only large copy of this image I could find was on Pinterest. The Pinterest post is here, the image itself is here.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Anton Pieck’s The Roof Painter

The Roof Painter, Anton Pieck
The Roof Painter, Anton Pieck

The Roof Painter, Anton Pieck

20th century Dutch illustrator, printmaker and gallery artist Anton Pieck was noted for his charming winter scenes. Here, he shows an artist, perhaps meant to be a representation of Pieck himself, finding a view of the town that requires him to climb to a roof peak. A boy brings him hot soup while a cat casually takes in the activity.

This was one of a series of graphics sometimes referred to as his Christmas Cards, that were actually intended as New Year’s cards.

 
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Adrian Tomine

Adrian Tomine, New Yorker cover, Dec 7, 2020
Adrian Tomine, New Yorker cover, Dec 7, 2020

Originally from California, Adrian Tomine is an illustrator and cartoonist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Tomine has taken to his adopted city so well that he has become a reader favorite contributor to the New Yorker.

His New Yorker covers, as well as many of his other illustrations and drawings, have that wonderful combination of evocative artwork and wry observation that exemplify the best of the magazine’s cover art. His artwork uses a streamlined line and color fill approach, reminiscent of the European ligne claire style of comics art.

As a case in point, his cover for the new December 7, 2020 issue of the New Yorker (images above, top) pretty well catches the whimsical side of the 2020 zeitgeist.

The New Yorker has a wonderful new online feature called Cover Story in which they give you background on the creation of the current issue’s cover; here is the one for Tomine’s December 7, 2020 cover.

Tomine is the author/illustrator of a number of books of drawings and comics, many of which are published by Drawn & Quarterly, and the latest of which is The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist (Bookshop.org link).

There is a video overview of some of his titles by “panellogy 080” on YouTube.

Tomine’s website contains examples of his illustrations and information about his books and comics, as well as offering prints and original art for sale.

Unfortunately, his online gallery is of the wearisome “pop up and close, pop up and close” variety, which discourages casual browsing, and the images offered are small. You might find it helpful to augment your visit to his website with this Google image search I’ve set up for Tomine’s work on newyorker.com.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Eyvind Earle trees

Eyvind Earle
Eyvind Earle

I don’t know the title or the size of this serigraph by ex illustrator and former Disney background artist turned gallery artist Eyvind Earle. I just know it’s wonderful.

I love the exaggerated atmospheric perspective, the trademark stylization of the trees, the splashes of light across the trees and shrubs and the perspective imparted by the geometric indication of field rows.

My link is to the image posted on Muddy Colors as part of this article.

For more, see my previous posts on Eyvind Earle, linked below.

 
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Christina Chung

Christina Chung illustration
Christina Chung illustration

Christina Chung is a Brooklyn based illustrator who describes her nationality as Taiwanese-Hongkonger-American. Her clients include The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Scientific American, Science Magazine, NPR, Abrams Books, Penguin Random House, and Lucasfilm, among others.

Her illustrations, often in a line and fill approach, use restrained palettes and carefully controlled value relationships to imbue complex drawings with harmony and mood. Her images invite you in to gradually reveal their thoughtful narrative elements.

Chung appears to work out her ideas with sketches in traditional media before moving to digital for the final illustration. There is a description and walk through of her process on the site of her artists representative, Richard Solomon.

 
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Holly Carden

Holly Carden cutaway illustrations
Holly Carden cutaway illustrations

I have to say that I just love cutaway illustrations, those wonderful glimpses of the workings of cars, aircraft, ships, machines, buildings and other complex objects in which the artist has granted the viewer the gift of x-ray vision.

Nashville based freelance illustrator Holly Carden creates some particularly nice cutaways of buildings, both real and imagined.

Her intriguingly complex buildings like “Macabre Mansion” and “Murder Castle” feature literary references or ties to actual events. Her blog features posts that give background on many of her illustrations, as well as detail crops, in progress images and process information.

Her most complex illustrations appear to be drawn in traditional media (pencil and ink), and then scanned into the computer for digital coloring.

Carden also does maps and more straightforward cartoon style illustration.

If the home page of her website looks more like an eCommerce site, it’s because two of her cutaway illustrations have recently been made into jigsaw puzzles. These are available through her online store, along with prints of some of her illustrations.

 
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