Antonio Segura Donat (Dulk)

Antonio Segura Donat (DULK)

Antonio Segura Donat (DULK)

Antonio Segura Donat is a Spanish artist who often works under the pseudonym Dulk, which he adopted originally for use as a street artist and muralist.

Dulk creates images that blend aspects of magic realism and fantasy, often with themes of animals, and in particular, birds.

He works in a variety of traditional media, paint, pens, pastel and markers, sometimes over silkscreen base prints. He also works in sculpture.

His website has galleries for Art, Illustration and Street art, and there are videos of him working. He has prints and other items for sale in Big Cartel. There is a collection of his work, The dulk; I believe the text is in Spanish, but you can find it from U.S. sources. Some of his original art can be found on Thinkspace.

 
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Fritz Baumgarten

Fritz Baumgarten, classic illustrations

Fritz Baumgarten, classic illustrations

Fritz Baumgarten was a German children’s book illustrator active in the early to mid part of the 20th century.

He illustrated numerous books, primarily in Germany, working in a nicely finessed combination of ink and watercolor.

Baumgarten had a knack for blending the commonplace with the fantastic, putting his elf-like characters and anthropomorphized creatures into scenes of activities that might otherwise seem quite ordinary.

Many of his portrayals of the forest floor are nicely naturalistic.

I haven’t been able to find many sources for his images, but I’ve included links to a few, below. I’ll also provide a link to a Google image search, with the size filter set to “large”, and some books available on Amazon (most appear to be German language editions).

 
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Frank C. Pape

Frank C. Pape classic illustration

Frank C. Pape classic illustration

Frank Cheyne Papé was an English illustrator active in the early 20th century. He worked in both monochrome and color. His style varied from naturalistic to fantastic to comic, and he sometimes mixed those approaches within a series of illustrations for a single volume.

Papé is not as well known as many of his contemporaries who worked in the latter part of the time known as the “golden age” of illustration, and little is known of his life.

There are some resources online for his work, and there are reprints of books he illustrated currently in print as well as available from used book sources.

The best bio I can find is the one by Jim Vadeboncoeur Jr. on his JVJ Publishing resource about illustrators.

 
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Happy Leyendecker Baby New Year 2019!

Happy Leyendecker Baby New Year from Lines and Colors!

Happy Leyendecker Baby New Year from Lines and Colors!

As has become my tradition every December 31st for the last 13 years, I’ll wish Lines and Colors readers a Happy New Year with some of J.C. Leyendecker’s wonderful Saturday Evening Post New Years covers.

American illustrator J.C. Leyendecker set our modern conception of representing the new year as a baby, with the use of a New Years baby to welcome in 1908. He continued the practice every year into the 1940s, usually incorporating topics of the day into his interpretation of the baby.

Here’s hoping you all have a great new year, filled with lots of great art and inspiration!

-Charley

 
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J.C. Leyendecker cover illustration for American Weekly

Mommy Kissing Santa Claus, Cover illustration for American Weekly, December 19, 1948; J.C. Leyendecker

Mommy Kissing Santa Claus, Cover illustration for American Weekly, December 19, 1948; J.C. Leyendecker (details)

Cover illustration for American Weekly, December 19, 1948; J.C. Leyendecker

Link is to Heritage Auctions sold lots. Accessing the full high-res image requires a free account, but there is a somewhat smaller version on Tumblr here.

At first I thought that this was Leyendecker’s take on the popular song, “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus”, but the illustration was published in 1948, and the song was apparently first recorded and released in 1952.

Whether the magazine cover influenced the writing of the song is difficult to say, but it seems to me a likely scenario.

This feels like it was quickly realized by the standard of many of Leyendecker’s other illustrations, but is still shows his superb draftsmanship, and characteristic stylized fabric folds and rendering of hair.

 
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Allen Douglas (update)

Allen Douglas, Cryptid Visions, fantasy illustration

Allen Douglas, Cryptid Visions, fantasy illustration

Allen Douglas is a painter and illustrator whose work I featured back in 2011. As an illustrator, his clients include Penguin, Putnam, Tor, Berkley, Random House, Scholastic, HarperCollins, Harcourt, Little Brown, Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, and Wizards of the Coast.

Since my previous post, Douglas has initiated a new series of works under the banner of “Cryptid Visions”. “Cryptid” refers to animals whose existence is in question. Douglas has taken flights of fancy that combine one species with another, juxtapose size relationships and delve into dragons and other mythical beasts.

Among the works on his Cryptid Visions website, you can also find a few straightforwardly naturalistic paintings of birds. On that site, you can also find a selection of prints and original paintings.

You can find more of his illustration work on his ArtStationand deviantArt portfolios, as well as on the site of his artist representatives, Shannon Associates, and Kid Shannon.

See also my previous post on Allen Douglas.

 
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