James Skvarch (update)

James Skvarch, etchings
James Skvarch, etchings

James Skvarch is an artist I featured back in 2007. He is primarily a printmaker working in traditional methods of etching. He uses to advantage the characteristics of etching that allow for delicate lines and hatching for tones. When printed on cream or off-white paper, these provide a visually appealing controlled contrast.

His website galleries are divided into sections for Landscapes, Interiors, Ships, Cars, and “Caprices” or imaginary structures; the latter inspired by the architectural fantasies of Giovanni Battista Piranesi.

There is also a section for “Paintings”, though the ones shown are few and older. There seems to be a bit of a disconnect in that regard between his website and his Facebook page, which features more recent paintings (images above, bottom).

As much as I enjoy his etchings of caprices, I admire even more his landscapes and interiors, which capture a sensation of light, place, and the texture of materials and objects.

I particularly enjoy his etching of Fort Herkimer Church (images above, top, with detail), in which he incorporates a landscape showing the exterior of the church into his drawing of the building’s interior.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Eye Candy for Today: Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor

Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor, Autumn in a Japanese Village

Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor, Autumn in a Japanese Village (details)

Autumn in a Japanese Village, Hiroshi Yoshida; watercolor on paper, roughly 13 x 20 in. (33 x 50 cm); link to image is on Ukiyo-e Search; I don’t know the location of the original.

Hiroshi Yoshida was a Japanese artist active the early to mid 20th century. He is known primarily for his extraordinarily beautiful woodblock prints in the shin-hanga style that show his affection for the traditions of both Japanese and Western art.

It is much less often the we see examples of his direct watercolor paintings. In this wonderful example, he takes advantage of atmospheric and textural effects that are difficult to achieve in woodblock printing.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Russell Chatham

Russell Chatham, landscape paintings and color lithogaphs
Russell Chatham, landscape paintings and color lithogaphs

Russell Chatham was an American landscape artist based for most of his career in Montana. Though he also produced oil paintings, he is known in particular for his beautifully subtle color lithographs, some of which use 30 or more layers of color to attain the final image.

His work shares some characteristics with tonalist painting, but I think of it as something aside and quite unique. I love the soft, poetic nuances of his color and value relationships, the meditative stillness of his scenes and the often bold geometry of his compositions.

Russell Chatham died this past November, 2019, at the age of 80. I don’t know of a dedicated website for his work; I’ve linked to a few other sources that I could find.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Eye Candy for Today: Cornelis Visscher, The Large Cat

Cornelis Visscher, The Large Cat, engraving

Cornelis Visscher, The Large Cat, engraving (details)

The Large Cat (Cat Sleeping), Cornelis Visscher, engraving, roughly 5 x 7 inches (14 x 18 cm)

I admire the way Visscher has varied the direction of his lines to indicate the natural texture of the cat’s fur, and the density of the lines to achieve his subtle variations in value.

The foreground foliage and background wall, indentation and daring little mouse give the composition depth, offsetting the dominance of the large figure of the animal within the frame of the image.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Martin Lewis

Martin Lewis, etching

Martin Lewis, etchings, drypoint, aquatint and engraving

Martin Lewis was an Australian/American printmaker, illustrator and painter active in the first half of the 20th century.

He is known primarily for his etchings of wonderfully evocative scenes of urban life, often focusing on the effects of artificial light in nighttime scenes.

In much of his work, shadows and areas absent of light play a role as important as objects and areas of light. The balance and play between them give his compositions a dynamic and visceral feeling of atmosphere and place.

Among his friends was Edward Hopper, who asked Lewis to teach him the fundamentals of etching.

[Via William Wray]

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Eye Candy for Today: William Lathrop etching

An Evening Walk, William Langson Lathrop, etching and drypoint

An Evening Walk, William Langson Lathrop, etching and drypoint

An Evening Walk, William Langson Lathrop

Etching and drypoint, roughly 18 x 15 inches (45 x37 cm), in the collection of the National Gallery of Art, DC, which has both zoomable and downloadable images. There is also a zoomable version on Google Art Project.

Lathrop was one of the group of painters active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in and around New Hope, Pennsylvania, who are often collectively known as the Pennsylvania Impressionists.

Lathrop was also a printmaker, and here uses both etching and drypoint to capture the mood of a quiet evening amid trees.

I particularly admire the way he has used multi-directional hatching to both create the dark values and suggest the textural bark of the trees without actually trying to draw a bark pattern.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin