Hiroshi Yoshida exhibit in Tokyo

Hiroshi Yoshida japanese woodblock prints exhibit in Tokyo
Hiroshi Yoshida japanese woodblock prints exhibit in Tokyo

Hiroshi Yoshida the wonderful Japanese printmaker — active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries — was trained in western art styles and painting and eventually combined those aesthetics with the traditions of Japanese art to create beautiful woodblock paints in the shin hanga style.

A new exhibition at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum commemorates the 70th anniversary of Yoshida’s death, and the online highlights of the exhibition offer a selection of high quality examples of his prints. The exhibition runs until March 28, 2021. I don’t know how long the exhibition website will be onine.

For more images and links to his work, see my previous posts on Hiroshi Yoshida.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Eye Candy for Today: Asano Takeji woodblock print

Snow at Ginkakuji Temple, Asano Takeji
Snow at Ginkakuji Temple, Asano Takeji
Snow at Ginkakuji Temple, Asano Takeji, woodblock print, sheet size 10 x 14 inches (26 x 36 cm); links is to Ukiyo-e Search, large file here.

Asano Takeji was a 20th century Japanese printmaker who worked in the manner of both the shin hanga (new prints) and sōsaku hanga (creative prints) schools of woodblock printmaking. The former is a collaborative effort between an artist, a carver, a printmaker and a publisher. In the latter, the artist does the entire process.

In the case of this beautiful evocation of a temple in the quiet of snow — one of the artist’s earliest prints — he is working in the shin hanga manner.

Happy Winter Solstice!

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Eye Candy for Today: Anton Pieck’s The Roof Painter

The Roof Painter, Anton Pieck
The Roof Painter, Anton Pieck

The Roof Painter, Anton Pieck

20th century Dutch illustrator, printmaker and gallery artist Anton Pieck was noted for his charming winter scenes. Here, he shows an artist, perhaps meant to be a representation of Pieck himself, finding a view of the town that requires him to climb to a roof peak. A boy brings him hot soup while a cat casually takes in the activity.

This was one of a series of graphics sometimes referred to as his Christmas Cards, that were actually intended as New Year’s cards.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

James Skvarch (update)

James Skvarch, etchings
James Skvarch, etchings

James Skvarch is an artist I featured back in 2007. He is primarily a printmaker working in traditional methods of etching. He uses to advantage the characteristics of etching that allow for delicate lines and hatching for tones. When printed on cream or off-white paper, these provide a visually appealing controlled contrast.

His website galleries are divided into sections for Landscapes, Interiors, Ships, Cars, and “Caprices” or imaginary structures; the latter inspired by the architectural fantasies of Giovanni Battista Piranesi.

There is also a section for “Paintings”, though the ones shown are few and older. There seems to be a bit of a disconnect in that regard between his website and his Facebook page, which features more recent paintings (images above, bottom).

As much as I enjoy his etchings of caprices, I admire even more his landscapes and interiors, which capture a sensation of light, place, and the texture of materials and objects.

I particularly enjoy his etching of Fort Herkimer Church (images above, top, with detail), in which he incorporates a landscape showing the exterior of the church into his drawing of the building’s interior.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Eye Candy for Today: Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor

Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor, Autumn in a Japanese Village

Hiroshi Yoshida watercolor, Autumn in a Japanese Village (details)

Autumn in a Japanese Village, Hiroshi Yoshida; watercolor on paper, roughly 13 x 20 in. (33 x 50 cm); link to image is on Ukiyo-e Search; I don’t know the location of the original.

Hiroshi Yoshida was a Japanese artist active the early to mid 20th century. He is known primarily for his extraordinarily beautiful woodblock prints in the shin-hanga style that show his affection for the traditions of both Japanese and Western art.

It is much less often the we see examples of his direct watercolor paintings. In this wonderful example, he takes advantage of atmospheric and textural effects that are difficult to achieve in woodblock printing.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin

Russell Chatham

Russell Chatham, landscape paintings and color lithogaphs
Russell Chatham, landscape paintings and color lithogaphs

Russell Chatham was an American landscape artist based for most of his career in Montana. Though he also produced oil paintings, he is known in particular for his beautifully subtle color lithographs, some of which use 30 or more layers of color to attain the final image.

His work shares some characteristics with tonalist painting, but I think of it as something aside and quite unique. I love the soft, poetic nuances of his color and value relationships, the meditative stillness of his scenes and the often bold geometry of his compositions.

Russell Chatham died this past November, 2019, at the age of 80. I don’t know of a dedicated website for his work; I’ve linked to a few other sources that I could find.

 
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin