Category Archives: Sc-fi and Fantasy

Jesper Ejsing (update)

Jesper Ejsing, fantasy illustrations
Jesper Ejsing is a Danish fantasy illustrator living in Copenhaen.

When I last wrote about Ejsing in 2013, it didn’t seem like he was updating his web presence frequently. Since then, he’s been adding more of his wonderfully wild illustration to his website, Artstation portfolio, and the group blog, Muddy Colors, where he is one of several contributing illustrators and concept artists.

Ejsing’s dragons, warriors, monsters and elves are rendered with wonderful touches of texture, varied palettes from almost monochrome to brightly colored and have a particularly appealing dimensionality to them.

Many of the pieces on his Artstation page are accompanied by preliminary sketches.

For more, see my previous post on Jesper Ejsing.

 
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James C. Christensen, 1942-2017

James C. Christensen, 1942-2017, fantasy illustrations

James C. Christensen, a highly regarded illustrator and gallery artist who worked in the vein of fantasy, spiritual inspiration, and works tinged with the flavor of Renaissance portraits, died on January 8, 2017.

Though there is a jameschristensen.com, it’s a commercial gallery’s site, and the images are watermarked (though not terribly so). A better source is the Greenwich Workshop (note the links at page bottom to subsequent pages).

There are a number of books featuring or collecting Christensen’s work (Amazon link), including A Journey of the Imagination: The Art of James Christensen, which has an introduction by James Gurney.

For more, see my previous post on James C. Christensen from 2010 (which is more informative than this brief one).

 
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X-Story, Vitaliy Shushko

X-Story, Vitaliy Shushko, animation
X-Story is an animated short (roughly 12 minutes) by Vitaliy Shushko.

At first, I thought this was a promo or incorporated animation for a game from a major company. Given the production values, length and level of accomplishment, I was surprised to find that this was an independent animation project.

I checked Shushko’s blog and found this described as his first animated short, and that it was two years in the making.

For an indy project like this, even though he had assistance (please see the Vimeo link for credits), I’m not surprised it took that long.

The story (which can be slightly gruesome in places) is not the point of this for me; it’s the level of storytelling, production, design and realization.

I’ve seen indy animation projects at a high level before, but they’re usually much shorter.

This is done in an anime-influenced style (particularly with reference to Otomo’s classic Akira), but it doesn’t succumb to the stylistic excesses that sometimes plague that genre. The design feels fresh and direct.

I hope somebody throws lots of money at Shushko, so he can keep producing animations like this.

View the video at full screen; my small screen captures don’t do the visuals justice.

[Via digg]

 
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Vladimir Kush (update)

Vladimir Kush, surreal, butterfly ship
Vladimir Kush is a Russian painter now living in the US, who I first wrote about in 2007.

Kush paints in a style derived from Surrealism, but that might more correctly be thought of as Magic Realism.

Since my last post, his website has been expanded with additional work, but it has also become more overtly commercialized, with an emphasis on prints, limited editions, and a series of brick and mortar galleries (perhaps following in the tradition of Thomas Kinkade).

Despite the commercial emphasis, I still find Kush interesting and fun, with clever juxtapositions of commonplace objects casting them into alternate meanings and roles.

He often explores repeated themes, most notably that of butterflies, and his most recognizable work is the butterfly-sail ship shown above, middle.

His website offers relatively small images, presented in a pop-up-and-close fashion that is not conducive to extended browsing. You may find it easier to browse through the larger images in some of the third-party articles linked below for an overview, and then come back to his site for more depth and additional images.

 
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Richard Wright

Richard Wright, concept art, illustration
Richard Wright is an illustrator, concept artist and matte painter based in the UK. Beyond that, there is no bio information on his website or ArtStation gallery.

His work is richly atmospheric and textural; his colors chosen to evoke mood and drama. I enjoy his use of suggestion in backgrounds, whether for environmental elements or distant objects, at times rendered in almost flat low-contrast sihlouette.

Wright’s work was featured in the June, 2016 issue of 2dartist magazine.

 
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Chris Seaman

Chris Seaman, illustration
Chris Seaman is an illustrator working in the gaming industry. His fantasy-themed illustrations are highly rendered, but always keep a feeling of cartoony verve and springy stylization, and often contain fun little touches in the details.

Seaman works in acrylic. There are a couple of brief process videos on his website, where he also has both originals and prints for sale..

I particularly enjoy his take-offs on famous images. like Holbein’s portrait of Henry VIII, and J.C. Leyendecker’s Arrow Shirt ad (images above, bottom three).

 
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