Igor Sava

Igor Sava, watercolor cityscape Italy
Originally from Kotovsk, Russia, and now based in Rome, Igor Sava is a watercolor painter who focuses on cityscapes in his adopted country.

Sava’s approach combines deft control of edges with the visual charm of freely mixed washes. His architectural subjects carry a feeling of atmosphere and light, as well as the textures of their materials.

On his website, you will find a gallery of paintings, as well as smaller galleries of watercolor figure sketches and imaginative subjects.

There is a brief YouTube video of Sava painting at the 2016 International Watercolor Society Biennial.

 
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Thierry Duval

Thierry Duval, watercolors of Paris
Thierry Duval is an artist from Paris, France, who paints the streets, buildings, plazas — and especially, bridges — of his home city in crisp, precisely observed watercolors.

Some of his paintings brim with light and contrast, others are poetically muted and atmospheric. Almost all have a palpable sense of the textures of stone, water and natural forms.

I can’t find a dedicated website for Duval, but you can see examples of his work on his Flickr galleries, and lots of images and videos of his process on his Instagram feed.

There is a collection of his work, Vues de Paris à L’aquarelle that I cannot find on Amazon US, but it is apparently available directly from the artist (information here); you can also see it on Amazon.fr. It is also apparently available from Gourcuff Gradenigo.

There is a brief overview of Duval’s work on YouTube and on Tutt’Art.

[Suggestion courtesy of James Gurney]

 
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James Niehues

James Niehues, hand painted aerial maps of ski resorts
James Niehues ia an artist based in Colorado who creates hand-painted aerial maps of ski resorts, golf resorts and other outdoor sporting sites.

He paints these at relatively large scale in gouache, using both brushes and airbrush, which allows him to give a high level of detail and texture to his largely mountainous scenes.

In the galleries on his website you will also find ski resorts in other parts of the US and internationally, as well as golf resorts. In addition, you will find aerial map views of mountain landscapes in warmer months and more traditional landscape views that he calls “scenic paintings”. (These are accessed from a not too obvious pop-out menu in the main navigation, or from a list in the page footer.)

Niehuse has a number of his images available as prints through ImageKind.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: James Peale miniature portrait

Elizabeth Oliphant, James Peale, watercolor on ivory
Elizabeth Oliphant, James Peale

Watercolor on ivory, roughly 3 x 2 inches (7 x 5.8 cm ). Link is to Wikimedia Commons, original is in the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

In the late 18th, and through the mid 19th centuries, there was a demand for miniature portraits, both in the U.S. and in Europe. These were usually painted in watercolor or gouache on oval ivory, often in the form of pendants, and were kept as keepsakes.

Ivory seems to lend itself well to this kind of miniature water media painting, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington has a nice collection of them, accessed in drawers.

I had a chance to look through some of them on a visit to the museum a couple of years ago and I can see the appeal; many are beautifully painted, often in a delicately applied stipple technique, as is the case in this beautiful example by American artist James Peale.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: William Henry Hunt watercolor and gouache still life

Apple, Grapes and a Cob-Nut , watercolor and gouache still life
Apple, Grapes and a Cob-Nut; William Henry Hunt

Watercolor and gouache over graphite; roughly 5 x 7 inches (13 x 19 cm); in the collection of the Yale Center for British Art, which has both a zoomable and downloadable version of the image on their site.

Early 19th century English artist William Henry Hunt painted his exactingly detailed still life subjects — often fruit or birds’ nests — in a painstaking stipple technique over a ground of “Chinese White” (zinc white gouache). This gave them a luminescent quality admired by the Pre-Raphaelite painters, who took up the technique later in the century.

 
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Ernst Graner

Ernst Graner, Austrian watercolor painter, watercolors of Vienna
Ernst Graner was and Austrian painter active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Graner painted genre scenes and landscapes, but is best known for his deftly rendered views of architecture and city scenes, particularly in Vienna.

In the larger images available on the web, you can see that for all the detail and accuracy of his paintings, his approach to watercolor is confidently relaxed and not stiff.

Some of the images I came across seemed overly saturated to me, as is often the case with online images of art from the 19th century and earlier. I’ve tried to select versions here that seem more likely to be true to the originals.

 
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