Jérémy Soheylian

Jeremy Soheylian, French artist, urban sketching in pen and watercolor
Though he sometimes works monochromatically, when I first came across the ink and watercolor architectural drawings and urban sketches of French artist Jérémy Soheylian the majority of his work at first registered to my eye as full color.

It then dawned on me that they were actually remarkably effective use of simple warm and cool tones — a muted sepia (or perhaps burnt sienna) and a cool, low chroma blue-gray. Soheylian is wonderfully adept at using the power of color temperature and value relationships to suggest distance and variety, with deft touches of pen work adding texture and a sensation of detail.

He occasionally also works in more colors, greens and higher chroma red-browns and blues, but still with a very limited palette. Some of his work is more sketch like, other pieces are more refined and finished. All of them evidence solid draftsmanship and a firm grasp of architectural form.

His website is in French, but is easily navigable by non-French speakers. “Peintures” are his watercolor paintings, “Dessins” are drawings in various media including urban sketches, and “Illustrations” are his more formal architectural drawings.

Soheylian also has a blog, which includes some step-throughs of his process. It’s also in French, and has more text than his website, but you can access it through Google Translate if you want a rough translation.

There is also a step-through of his process on Canson Studio. In addition, there is a brief interview with Soheylian on the French version of the Canson Studio site, Google Translate here (scroll down).

If you do a Google Image Search, you’ll find a number of his images from other sources.

There is a brief video about Soheylian on YouTube that is in Russian, but has a view of him working.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: William Wyld watercolor

St. Mark's Square, Venice, with Loggetta, William Wyld, ink and watercolor
St. Mark’s Square, Venice, with Loggetta; William Wyld

Watercolor and ink, roughly 10 x 7 inches (25 x 18 cm); in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Use the Download or Enlarge links under the image on their page.

I love this beautiful ink and watercolor rendering, not just for its wonderful combination of precision and sketch-like freedom, but for its unusual view of St. Mark’s Square. There are dozens, if not hundreds of beautifully rendered paintings and drawings of that most famous of Venice’s public squares, but most are from the far end, looking down the full length of the plaza.

Here, Wyld gives us a much more intimate view, the kind you might encounter as you walked about the edges of the square, and with a daring composition as well. The dark, shadowed foreground presents the primary figures almost in silhouette against the lighter base of the campanile.

The differently colored tiles in the paving lead us back to the distant group of figures, and the angled view of the Loggetta brings us back out to more shadowed foreground.

 
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Bror Anders Wikstrom

Bror Anders Wikstrom, imaginative float designs of dragons and other, in watercolor
With the exception of the more straightforward watercolor (images above, bottom), the rest of these wild and wonderfully realized watercolor illustrations are designs for New Orleans carnival parade floats from the early part of the 20th century by Swedish/American artist Bror Anders Wikstrom.

Wikstrom originally went to sea as a young man, but his career as a sailor was curtailed by changes in his eyesight. Nearsightedness did not prevent him from pursuing studies in art in Stockholm and Paris, and he applied his artistic learning to magazine illustrations, advertising design, prints, cartoons, murals and portraits.

Coming to the U.S., he settled in New Orleans and became noted for his designs for carnival floats for two of the prominent krews, Rex and Proteus.

A number of his float designs are maritime in nature, others are wilder fantasy, often featuring dragons and other fantastical creatures.

He also painted landscapes and marine paintings, though I can’t find as many examples of those; you can find some on Artnet and Invaluable (and here).

 
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Igor Sava

Igor Sava, watercolor cityscape Italy
Originally from Kotovsk, Russia, and now based in Rome, Igor Sava is a watercolor painter who focuses on cityscapes in his adopted country.

Sava’s approach combines deft control of edges with the visual charm of freely mixed washes. His architectural subjects carry a feeling of atmosphere and light, as well as the textures of their materials.

On his website, you will find a gallery of paintings, as well as smaller galleries of watercolor figure sketches and imaginative subjects.

There is a brief YouTube video of Sava painting at the 2016 International Watercolor Society Biennial.

 
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Thierry Duval

Thierry Duval, watercolors of Paris
Thierry Duval is an artist from Paris, France, who paints the streets, buildings, plazas — and especially, bridges — of his home city in crisp, precisely observed watercolors.

Some of his paintings brim with light and contrast, others are poetically muted and atmospheric. Almost all have a palpable sense of the textures of stone, water and natural forms.

I can’t find a dedicated website for Duval, but you can see examples of his work on his Flickr galleries, and lots of images and videos of his process on his Instagram feed.

There is a collection of his work, Vues de Paris à L’aquarelle that I cannot find on Amazon US, but it is apparently available directly from the artist (information here); you can also see it on Amazon.fr. It is also apparently available from Gourcuff Gradenigo.

There is a brief overview of Duval’s work on YouTube and on Tutt’Art.

[Suggestion courtesy of James Gurney]

 
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James Niehues

James Niehues, hand painted aerial maps of ski resorts
James Niehues ia an artist based in Colorado who creates hand-painted aerial maps of ski resorts, golf resorts and other outdoor sporting sites.

He paints these at relatively large scale in gouache, using both brushes and airbrush, which allows him to give a high level of detail and texture to his largely mountainous scenes.

In the galleries on his website you will also find ski resorts in other parts of the US and internationally, as well as golf resorts. In addition, you will find aerial map views of mountain landscapes in warmer months and more traditional landscape views that he calls “scenic paintings”. (These are accessed from a not too obvious pop-out menu in the main navigation, or from a list in the page footer.)

Niehuse has a number of his images available as prints through ImageKind.

 
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