Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Art Museum Day 2017

Art Museum Day 2017
Tomorrow, Thursday May 18, 2017, is Art Museum Day here in the U.S.

Organized by the Association of Art Museum Directors, it’s an event in which participating museums open their doors for free and often feature events, tours and museum shop discounts.

Unlike the broader Museum Day, organized by the Smithsonian and generally held in September, this event has no requirement for advance tickets or limitations on the number of museums you can visit on the day.

This page devoted to Art Museum Day, though it may not be obvious at first, offers a list of participating museums, arranged by state.

The images above are of some of the participating museums here in the Philadelphia area: the Philadelphia Museum of Art; The Brandywine River Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Museum of American Art and the Barnes Foundation.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Monday, May 15, 2017

Eye Candy for Today: Francis Hopkinson Smith watercolor of Venice

Over a Balcony, View of the Grand Canal, Venice; Francis Hopkinson Smith watercolor
“Over a Balcony,” View of the Grand Canal, Venice; Francis Hopkinson Smith

Watercolor; roughly 32 x 21 inches (80 x 53 cm); in the collection of the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. On their page, click on “Explore Object” at the top of the image for a zoomable view, or use the “Download Image” link.

This superb late 19th century watercolor of Venice by American artist and engineer Francis Hopkinson Smith is remarkable on several levels.

Not only is it a beautiful evocation of a view from a balcony in the Academia section of the city toward one of its great landmarks — the church and basilica of Santa Maria della Salute — it also captures the variation in light through the scene caused by the scattered cloud cover. The church domes are in sharp sun and shadow, as is the landing forward of that; but the foreground and other parts of the middle distance are in the muted light of an overcast day.

In addition, Smith has delineated the architecture with lines visible through the areas of color, giving the picture the charm of both a drawing and a painting simultaneously.

Most appealing to me, however, is the way he has shifted our view from far to near — essentially in three steps, from the distant curve of the main island beyond the mouth of the canal, to the succinctly delineated middle ground of the church and its environs, to the immediate foreground of the flower pots and ledges, the nearest only an arm’s reach from the artist’s vantage point.

Wonderful.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Ignat Ignatov

Ignat Ignatov paintings, landscape, wildlife, figurative and still life subjects
Originally from Bulgaria, where he also received his initial artistic training, Ignat Ignatov is an artist now living and working in California.

Ignatov paints landscape, wildlife, figurative and still life subjects with a painterly and at times gestural, semi-abstract approach. I particularly enjoy his figurative and portrait subjects, in which he often plays with moody or theatrical lighting, colored accents and abstract backgrounds.

The images on his own website are frustratingly small; you can find some larger examples of his wok on the LePrince gallery site (click through twice from the thumbnails) and in this article on Tutt’ Art.

Though not large, the images on Ignatov’s instructor bio page on the Los Angeles Academy of Figurative Art are a particularly nice selection of his work.

Ignatov offers two DVDs on his website, one is a documentary on the artist, the other is an instructional video on portrait painting.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Eye Candy for Today: Theodore Rousseau pen and wash drawing

Village and Church of Beurre, Franche-Comte, Theodore Rousseau
Village and Church of Beurre, Franche-Comté, Théodore Rousseau

Pen and brown ink, with brown wash and touches of green and red-brown watercolor, over graphite; roughly 7 x 10 inches (17 x 26 cm); in the collection of the Morgan Library and Museum, which has both a zoomable and downloadable version.

19th century landscape painter Théodore Rousseau, one of the key figures in the Barbizon School, here portrays a charming scene of the French village of Beurre, near the border with Switzerland.

Rousseau has captured the trees and buildings with quick, gestural pen strokes, filled in with loosely applied touches of tone. I get an impression of him sitting at the edge of the road, taking in the full essence of the scene and its key value relationships with the most economical notation at his command.

I love the way he has suggested the nature of the shallow water in the foreground without laboring over the usual visual clues of reflections and downward strokes. He simply noted it as he saw it — the reflections mere scribbles with splashes of tone — but his grasp of the immediate appearance of the area reads true as water.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Olivier Pron (update)

Olivier Pron , concept art and environments for feature films, Guardians of the Galaxy, Cloud Atlas, Jupiter Ascending, Dr. Strange
Olivier Pron is a concept artist, originally from London and now working with Method visual effects studio in Los Angeles as Supervising Art Director and Head of the Art Department.

When I initially wrote about Pron in 2014, he had just started his blog, and did not have a great deal of work available online. Since then he has established a new website that highlights his concept design work for major feature films, including his pre-production designs for the much talked about shifting reality city scenes in Dr. Strange.

I also particularly enjoy his designs for Jupiter Ascending, which demonstrate to good advantage his ability to convey enormous scale, a visual concept that is in great demand in contemporary fantasy and science fiction films.

On his new site, you can also see Pron’s concepts for films like Guardians of the Galaxy, Cloud Atlas, Suicide Squad, Thor – The Dark World, Wathcmen, Hellboy 2, Harry Potter – The Deathly Hallows Part 2, and others.

I don’t see any information on his process, but it looks like he is using a combination of digital techniques to achieve his final visualizations.

It’s worth pointing out again that when you see concept designs for popular movies, you might unconsciously think of them as interpretations of the familiar film scenes, forgetting that you are seeing the original artist’s visualization on which the scenes and effects in the film are based.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Eye Candy for Today: Franz Xaver Winterhalter pencil portrait

Portrait of Baroness Gudin, nee Margareth Louis Hay, Franz Xaver Winterhalter, pencil portrait
Portrait of Baroness Gudin, née Margareth Louis Hay, Franz Xaver Winterhalter

Graphite, roughly 15 x 11 (40 x 29 cm); in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In this deceptively simple, sensitively realized pencil portrait, 19th century German painter Franz Xaver Winterhalter has given particular attention to nuances of value changes in the shadowed side of the face. These are actually easier to see at first in the smaller reproductions; you can then identify them in the closer crops.

Specifically, I admire his handling of the uplighting under the woman’s chin, and to a reduced extent, on her cheek — contrasted with the darker plane of the top of the cheek between the eye and the nose. The light picks up in the indentation at the side of the mouth, and again above the eye.

Also particularly appealing are the soft edges and close value relationships in the rendering of the lips and nose, where the artist has resisted the temptation to push the dark contrasts in these areas.

In the closer views, Winterhalter’s deft, confident application of tone appears to reflect a degree of tooth in the paper.

 
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin