Eye Candy for Today: Marten van Valckenborch Tower of Babel

The Tower of Babel, Marten van Valckenborch the Elder
The Tower of Babel, Marten van Valckenborch the Elder

The link is to a zoomable version of the image on Google Art Project; there is a downloadable file on Wikimedia Commons; the original is in the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Dresden State Art Museums.

Flemish Renaissance painter Marten van Valckenborch painted a number of complex compositions depicting the Biblical story of the building of the Tower of Babel (of which you can find some other examples here and here).

I’ve found this one in particular to be striking in its dark, sombre tones, set against a light but clouded sky and framed by a cradle of dark foreground elements.

The repetition of forms and change in size of the elements as the tower ascends has a fascinatingly recursive feel to it.

It’s interesting to compare Van Vlakenborch’s interpretations to that of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, which was undoubtedly a primary influence on them, and on similar takes on the subject by other artists.

The story of the Tower of Babel is a story of hubris, a term we should all have in our awareness as we watch current events unfold.

 
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Denise Dumont

Denise Dumont, landscape paintings
Denise Dumont is a Delaware based artist who applies her fresh, painterly approach to urban, rural and particularly coastal scenes of Delaware, Maryland and New England.

I enjoy her scenes of dune paths and vegetation, in which she plays with effects of shadow, light and texture. She finds similar characteristics in the portrayal of snow covered paths in winter.

Dumont’s work is currently on view in Odessa, Delaware at the Historic Odessa Foundation, until October 15, 2017.

[Via WHYY]

 
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Chris Malbon

Chris Malbon, UK illustrator
Chris Malbon is a UK based illustrator and designer who works in both traditional and digital media.

He has done work for a number of agencies and clients including work for Sony, Coca-Cola, Nestle, Nike and MTV.

Malbon’s approach varies with his project, but is often vibrant with texture and color. He sometimes does complex collage-like compositions with multiple figures and objects intertwined into a graphic design, with strong contrasts of detailed areas to open space.

[Via iSpot]

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Jacob van Walscapelle Still Life with Fruit

 Jacob van Walscapelle oil painting, Still Life with Fruit
Still Life with Fruit, Jacob van Walscapelle

Link is to zoomable version on Google Art Project; downloadable high-res file on Wikimedia Commons; original is in the National Gallery of Art, DC, which also has zoomable and downloadable versions of the image.

Compared to some of Van Walscapelle’s more elaborate 17th century still life paintings, this one is relatively small (16 x 14 inches, 40 x 35 cm) and the subject matter simple, but it has all the visual punch of his larger compositions.

It’s full of beautiful touches — the delicate rendering of the hazelnut husks, the gentle definition of the wine glass, the rich, dramatic rendering of the pomegranate and grapes, and the wonderfully naturalistic twining of the grape vines.

Look at the drops of water on the stone top to the left of the nuts, and the almost not there rendering of the support under the stone. There are also droplets of water on the pomegranate and the grape leaf.

I love the way the entire composition seems to emerge from darkness, and yet is so bold in its center, without losing the sense that everything is connected and lit by the same light source.

Wonderful.

 
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Inktober

Inktober 2017, Jake Parker, Moemai, Max Dunbar, Meredith Dillman, Abbe Branberg, Camille Marie, Chordephra, Loish, Alyssa Tallent, Jason Chan, Mack Chater, Sweeny Boo, Yuko Shimizu, Paul Heaston, Nick Nikopoulos, Stoaty Weasel, Ian McQue, Ira Sluyterman van Langeweyde
Inktober started as a challenge illustrator and cartoonist Jake Parker set himself in October of 2009, to draw 31 ink drawings in 31 days.

The goal, as in any exercise of this sort, was to get better end develop a more consistent working practice.

He repeated the idea the next year, promoting the notion that others should join him, and since then it has grown into a worldwide endeavor.

If you search on Twitter, Instagram or other social media platforms for #inktober, or #inktober2017, you’ll find the stream of those currently participating.

There is a lot of variation in style and level of ability, from novice to professional, and that’s part of what makes it such a great practice. There is no barrier to entry.

It’s not a contest, there are no real requirements or central authority deciding who can participate.

The rules, such as there are, are simple: do an ink drawing and post it online with the hashtags #inktober and #inktober2017 — repeat every day in October.

Even though this is the fifth day, it’s not too late to join in, I see lots of posts that say “late to the party” or “just joining in”. If you want to, you can throw in a few extra drawings along the way to come up with 31 by the end of the month.

You don’t have to use a dip pen or anything fancy; anything that makes marks in ink counts: ballpoint pens, markers, brush pens, whatever. The drawings don’t have to be elaborate or finished, and you can add color or not as you choose.

If you need suggestions for subject matter, there is an official prompt of 31 subjects on the Inktober website.

You don’t have to follow it, though. Lots of people make their own prompt list, or choose to do a single subject (e.g. cats, cars, portraits or monsters….), or just do whatever comes to you.

You can look through the social media feeds to see what others are doing, or simply for the enjoyment of it.

You will encounter a lot of work by beginners, and this is a Good Thing; part of the value of the practice is encouraging folks to get started. If you’re looking through with the thought of finding professional work, you might do better to seek the more curated experience of following Jake Parker’s Twitter feed, or the @inktober feed.

The images above are just some examples (mostly by professionals) that caught my eye. I particularly enjoy those images in which the artist has included their drawing tools in the photo with the drawing.

(Images above [some of these names are just Twitter handles]: Jake Parker, Moemai, Max Dunbar, Meredith Dillman, Abbe Branberg, Camille Marie, Chordephra, Loish, Alyssa Tallent, Jason Chan, Mack Chater, Sweeny Boo, Yuko Shimizu, Paul Heaston, Nick Nikopoulos, Stoaty Weasel, Ian McQue, Ira Sluyterman van Langeweyde)

 
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Women Painting Women, RJD Gallery 2017

Women Painting Women, RJD Gallery 2017; paintings by: Bryony Bensly, Erin Anderson, Jantina Peperkamp, Rachel Moseley, Sarah Stieber, Dana Hawk, Daggi Wallace, Odile Richer, Margo Selski, Andrea Kowch
Women Painting Women: A Voice with a Vision” is a group show at the RJD Gallery in Bridgehampton, NY (Long Island) that opens this Saturday, October 7, and runs to October 30, 2017.

The title of the show pretty well describes the theme. There is a nice variety of approaches — within the traditions of representational realism.

This is the 5th annual version of the exhibition; I previously covered the 2015 show.

As of this writing, the page for the exhibition on the gallery’s website is out of date, and is still focused on artist submissions rather than promoting the final show to gallery goers.

However, there is an online gallery of nicely zoomable images of work from the show on the gallery’s Artsy page.

(Images above: Bryony Bensly, Erin Anderson, Jantina Peperkamp, Rachel Moseley, Sarah Stieber, Dana Hawk, Daggi Wallace, Odile Richer, Margo Selski, Andrea Kowch)

[Via Karin Jurick]

 
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