Thomas Stoop

Thomas Stoop, concept artist
Thomas Stoop is a freelance concept artist from the Netherlands who works in a textural brushy style of digital painting, with softly muted palettes that give his compositions an nice sense of atmospheric perspective.

The images on his website and ArtStation portfolio are mostly of personal work that showcases his abilities; the ones on ArtStation are a bit larger. You can find additional work on his deviantART gallery, and prints of some pieces on InPrint.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Helen Searle still life

Still Life with Fruit and Champagne, Helen Searle
Still Life with Fruit and Champagne, Helen Searle

In the Smithsonian American Art Museum; there is a somewhat larger version of the image on Wikimedia Commons, but it’s unfortunately not well focused.

Careful you don’t get stung reaching for a grape.

 
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Matthew Cornell

Matthew Cornell
There is something special about twilight; the transitional period between day and night can also be a metaphor for the transition between consciousness and sleep, past and present, the remembered and forgotten.

Like the state between waking and sleep, twilight can also be a period in which two different states coexist, the fading but still rich colors of the day and the glow of nighttime lights mingle in a way that evokes stillness and contemplation.

Florida based painter Matthew Cornell uses all of these elements to effect in his series of paintings that are part of a new solo show at Arcadia Contemporary in New York, titled “Pilgrimage”.

His often small scale paintings of suburban homes, streets, driveways and garages, made almost mystical by their twilight settings, are laden with meaning, as Cornell revisits in particular places of significance in his life after the recent death of his parents.

He also visits the childhood homes of his parents, wrapping all in the half remembered/half present sensation of muted light.

“Pilgrimage” will be on display at Arcadia Contemporary from March 19 to April 22, 2915.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Henriette Browne’s Girl Writing

A Girl Writing; The Pet Goldfinch, Henriette Browne
A Girl Writing; The Pet Goldfinch, Henriette Browne

Link is to zoomable image on Google Art Project; there is a downloadable high-res file on Wikimedia Commons; the original is in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. [Correction: the original is in the Bethnal Green Museum of Childhood, Costume, Play and Learn Gallery, which is either part of, or associated with the V&A.]

A beautifully sensitive portrait/genre scene. Browne’s superb control of values allows the soft, indirect light of the scene to reveal rich details while holding the composition in a harmonious balance.

I haven’t seen the original, but I think the Google Art Project and Wikimedia Commons versions of the image are dark and oversaturated. I’ve corrected the Wikimedia file here to bring it closer to the version on the V&A site.

 
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Gari Melchers

Gari Melchers
Gari Melchers was an American artist, born in Detroit, who studied in Germany and France in the late 19th century, and settled for a time in Holland. He eventually returned to the US, lived and worked in New York for several years, and eventually retired to Virginia.

His estate in Virginia, Belmont, is now a Gari Melchers house and studio museum, housing an extensive collection of his work; though the official website lacks a gallery of images.

Melchers combined naturalism with the painterly influence of the French Impressionists. His subjects were often domestic scenes, particulalry his wife and child, as well as scenes of devotion — sometimes combined, with hinted halos in portraits.

He became well known and in demand in Europe, though less so in the US. He is much less well known these days than his contemporaries like Sargent, William Merritt Chase and others among the American Impressionists who shared some of the same esthetic influences.

 
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Japanese prints from the Met via Ukiyo-e Search

Japanese prints from the Met via Ukiyo-e Search: Utagawa Kunisada, Ogata Gekko, Yoshida Hiroshi, Suzuki Harunobu, Toyohara Chikanobu, Katsushika Hokusai, Totoya Hokkei, Utagawa Hiroshige, Utagawa Toyohiro, Utagawa Kuniyoshi

This week is one of the weeks designated two times a year as “Asia Week New York” by the Japanese Art Dealers Association, during which a number of galleries, auction houses and museums make a point of having relevant exhibits.

Rather than feature images from temporary exhibits, I’m focusing here on a specific ongoing source of images — in this case Japanese woodblock prints from the extensive permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, as made particularly easy to browse through the fantastic online resource Ukiyo-e Search (see my previous post on Ukiyo-e Search).

If you like Japanese prints, you’ll find this worthy of a Timesink Warning.

[Please note: some of the prints in the collection are erotic in nature, and are NSFW and not suitable for children.]

(Images above, surnames first, with links to my posts where available: Utagawa Kunisada, Ogata Gekko, Yoshida Hiroshi, Suzuki Harunobu, Toyohara Chikanobu, Katsushika Hokusai, Totoya Hokkei, Utagawa Hiroshige, Utagawa Toyohiro, Utagawa Kuniyoshi)

 
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