Eye Candy for Today: Janet Fish still life

Red Vase and Yellow Tulips, Janet Fish
Red Vase and Yellow Tulips, Janet Fish (details)

Red Vase and Yellow Tulips, Janet Fish; oil and graphite on canvas, roughly 42 x 86 in. (107 x 220 cm), private collection; link is to Christie’s Auctions.

Janet Fish is a contemporary American painter known for her luminous still life paintings, particularly of clear and colored glassware.

For more, see my previous post on Janet Fish.

James Jebusa Shannon

James Jebusa Shannon
James Jebusa Shannon

Born in the U.S., James Jebusa Shannon moved to the UK to study when he was 16, and spent most of his life and career there.

Shannon made his mark as a highly successful portrait painter and has been compared to his contemporary, John Singer Sargent.

Eye Candy for Today: Autumn Trees along a Stream by Hugh Bolton Jones

Autumn Trees along a Stream by Hugh Bolton Jones
Autumn Trees along a Stream by Hugh Bolton Jones (details)

Autumn Trees along a Stream by Hugh Bolton Jones, oi on canvas, 16 x 24 inches (41 x 61 cm). Link is to page on Wikimedia Commons from which you can view a larger image. I don’t know the location of the original, but it was imaged by Vose Galleries, so I assume it’s in a private collection at this point.

American painter Hugh Bolton Jones, though not well known, is one of my favorite landscape painters. I partiularly enjoy his brushy, painterly techniques for representing trees and other foliage.

In this piece, he gives us an unassuming but beautiful scene of a group of young trees around a small stream.

Happy Autumnal Equinox!

Alberto Varanda

Alberto Varanda, comics and illustration
Alberto Varanda, comics and illustration

Alberto Varanda is a French comics artist who has worked on a number of projects for different French and Belgian publishers. You can find English language versions of his Little Pierrot comics album on Bookshop.org and Amazon, and French editions of other books on Amazon.

His style can range from cartoon like children’s book illustration to various levels of comics illustration to intricate pen and ink renderings. I particularly enjoy the latter, as well as his looser figure sketches.

His website is available in both French and English versions, though some of the pages are only available in French.

Eye Candy for Today: Caillebotte’s Yerres, Effect of Rain

erres Effect of Rain, Gustave Caillebotte impressionist painting
erres Effect of Rain, Gustave Caillebotte impressionist painting

Yerres, Effect of Rain, Gustave Caillebotte, oil on canvas, roughly 32 x 23 inches (80x 59 cm).

Link is to page on WikiArt, from which you can click “View All Sizes” to get to a larger image. Original is in the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University Bloomington.

I had the pleasure of seeing this in person at an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in 2009. Most of the images of this painting on the internet, including the museum’s website, are too dark and oversaturated. The one I’m linking to is not bad, though I’ve taken the liberty of lightening is slightly. There is another here on Flickr.

Several of Caillebotte’s works are subtitled with the word “effect” — as in Rooftop View (Effect of snow). Like the other French Impressionists, Caillebotte was concerned with the effects of light and atmosphere under different conditions.

Here, he gives us a perfect evocation of the light and atmosphere of a light rain on a small stream. The Yerres River is a tributary of the Seine, southeast of Paris, near where the artist lived.

Lui Ferreya

Lui Ferreya artwork
Lui Ferreya artwork

Lui Ferreya is a freelance artist based in Denver, Colorado. On his website and in his Behance portfolio you will find drawings and other works in media both tradtional and digital.

Ferreya breaks down forms, whether of landscape, still life or portraiture, into geometric planes, and further subdivides these into smaller planes that he defines with linear patterns of tone and color.

His palette, though often high in chroma, is carefully controlled in terms of value and color relationships, allowing him to work a wide range of colors into small areas that in turn read as larger areas and feel almost naturalistic.

I particularly enjoy the way he approaches faces. With a keen awareness of the planes of the head and face, he marks off discreet areas, but maintains transitions that look soft edged because of the subtlety of the color relationships.

[Via Kottke and Colossal]