Oleg Denisenko (revisited)

Oleg denisenko, Ukrainian artist
Oleg denisenko, Ukrainian artist

Oleg Denisenko is a Ukrainian printmaker, painter, calligrapher and sculptor who I first featured in 2007, and again in 2012.

His wonderfully eccentric subjects center on figures with elaborate costumes, intricately detailed an accompanied by a range of curious objects. He plays with proportion and scale and varying degrees of exaggeration.

Denisenko appears to vary the color of his printing inks an papers and also works in full color at times.

He shares a website called Antiqvitas Nova with his father, filmmaker Alexander Denisenko (in which they spell their name Denysenko with a “y”, though it’s listed in multiple other sources with the spelling I’m using here).

For more, see my previous two posts on Oleg Denisenko (linked below).

 
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Ivan Pokhitonov (revisited)

Ukrainian painter Ivan Pokhitonov
Ukrainian painter Ivan Pokhitonov

Ivan Pokhitonov is a Ukrainian painter I featured on Lines and Colors in 2019.

Many of his strikingly beautiful landscapes and occasional portraits are quite a bit smaller than you might assume from the images.

For more information, images and links to sources of images, see my previous post on Ivan Pokhitonov.

 
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Some Ukrainian artists

Ukrainian artists, Stepan Kolesnikoff
Ukrainian artists, Denis Sarazhin, Konstantin Bogaevsky, Iryna Yermolova, Ivan Sulima, Oleg Kozak, Zinaida Serebriakova, Vladimir Orlovsky, Sergei Iukhimov, Dmitri Danish, Arkhip Kuindzhi, Evgeni Gordiets, Oleg Denisenko

I’ve been writing Lines and Colors for more then 15 years. I found with a recent search of my own posts that in that time, I’ve featured a number of wonderful Ukrainian artists.

I’ve sometimes described these artists as “Russian/Ukrainian” artists. Ukrainian artists are often described this way, partly because Ukraine was for a long time subjugated by the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, and partly because, within that sphere, there was much interaction between the art communities in these regions and the Russian art schools and art establishment. Many painters from Ukraine were trained in Russia and spent time living and working there.

I’ve learned in the last two weeks that previous Soviet and Russian despots, notably Lenin and Stalin, have tried to basically eradicate the identity of Ukrainians as a separate people, along with their cultural identity. Most experts agree that Putin’s intentions would be no different.

You can find some of my posts about Ukrainian artists in the links below. I’ll follow up with some “revisit” posts to focus on individual artists.

These are just some Ukrainian artists I happen to have featured previously. You can find a couple of more comprehensive lists of Ukrainian art and artists on Wikiart and Wikimedia Commons.

(images above: Stepan Kolesnikoff, Denis Sarazhin, Konstantin Bogaevsky, Iryna Yermolova, Ivan Sulima, Oleg Kozak, Zinaida Serebriakova, Vladimir Orlovsky, Sergei Iukhimov, Dmitri Danish, Arkhip Kuindzhi, Oleg Denisenko, Evgeni Gordiets)

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Easter Matins by Ukrainian artist Mykola Pymonenko

Easter Matins, by Ukranian painter Mykola Pymonenk
Easter Matins, by Ukranian painter Mykola Pymonenk

Easter Matins, Mykola Pymonenk

, oil on canvas, roughly 52 x 76 inches (133 x 193 cm). Link is to the file page on Wikipedia; original is in the Rybinsk State Historical-Architectural and Artistic Preserve Museum in Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia.

Mykola Pymonenko was a Ukranian artist active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His scene of the early morning observance is lit by both candlelight and the early dawn.

Pymonenko is just one of many notable Ukranian painters. Though many of them have a history of cultural exchanges with the larger schools and movements of Russian painting, they often take their own regional culture as subjects.

When a people and their nation are attacked, so is their culture.

War is the anthesis of art, destruction as opposed to creation; polar opposites of human behavior.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Edward Redfield’s The Upper Delaware

The Upper Delaware, Edward Redfield, Pennsyvania Impressionist landscape
The Upper Delaware (details), Edward Redfield, Pennsyvania Impressionist landscape

The Upper Delaware, Edward Willis Redfield, oil on canvas, roughly 38 x 50 inches (96 x 127 cm).

Link is to zoomable image on Google Art Project; high res (33mb) image available on Wikimedia commons; original is in the collection of the James A Michenner Art Museum in Bucks county PA, which unfortunately does not put much effort into displaying works from their collection online.

Redfield, though not the founder, is often thought of as the leader of the group of painters who settled along the Delaware River north of Philadelphia in the early 20th century that is often referred to as the “New Hope School”, or the “Pennsylvania Impressionists”.

Refield was noted for his winter scenes, and this beautiful depiction of the Delaware River as it passes through a rocky area some miles north of New Hope is a striking example.

 
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Julia Hill

Julia Hill pen and ink
Julia Hill pen and ink

Julia Hill is an illustrator based in Devon, England who works primarily in pen and ink, using fine-line markers. Her main subject is animals, both domestic and small wild. She also indulges in whimsical fantasy illustrations with animals in human clothing and situations.

Her website is basically her store, so her primary online gallery appears to be her space on DoodleAddicts.

Some of the entries on the DoodleAddicts site include process step-throughs, and more information about her choice of pens and paper. She works with a lot of fine hatching to create tones and textures.

The DoodleAddicts website also offers a short interview with the artist, in which she also talks about her materials.

Etsy UK

https://www.doodleaddicts.com/juliahillillustrator/

Interview on DoodleAddicts

 
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