Eye Candy for Today: Carl Larsson domestic interior

When the Children have Gone to Bed, Carl Larsson, watercolor
When the Children have Gone to Bed, Carl Larsson, watercolor

When the Children have Gone to Bed, Carl Larsson, ink and watercolor, roughly 12 x 17 inches (32 x 43 cm). Link is to image page on Wikimedia Commons. Original is in the NatinalMuseum, Stockholm.

Another of Carl Larsson’s wonderful ink and watercolor domestic scenes. This was part of a series called “A Home”, based on his own home and family.

I particularly like Larsson’s treatment of the lamp and its effects in the directional shadows of objects against the wall and the value statement of the faces.

Eye Candy for today: Whistler’s Purple and Rose: The Lange Leizen of the Six Marks

Purple and Rose: The Lange Leizen of the Six Marks, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, oil on canvas
Purple and Rose: The Lange Leizen of the Six Marks, James Abbott McNeill Whistler (details), oil on canvas

Purple and Rose: The Lange Leizen of the Six Marks, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, oil on canvas, roughly 37 x 24 inches (93 x 61 cm); in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which has both a zoomable and downloadable image on their site.

The original painting is here in Philadelphia and I’ve admired it many times. I can also say with confidence that the museum’s own image of the painting is too dark (as is often the case). I’ve taken the liberty of lightening the image as I’ve shown it here.

Whistler, like many of his 19th century European and American contemporaries, became fascinated with the prints, ink paintings, pottery and other cultural artifacts being imported from Eastern Asia at the time.

Here, he has posed his model in colorful tradational dress, surrounded by blue and white Chinese porcelain, many pieces of which were from his own collection.

“Lange Leizen” is a Dutch term for “long ladies”, referring to a genre of decorative pottery that featured images of thin women.

I love the painterly touch in his depictions of the porcelain and fabric.

Eye Candy for Today: William McGregor Paxton’s House Maid

The House Maid, William McGregor Paxton, oil on canvas
The House Maid, William McGregor Paxton, oil on canvas (details)

The House Maid, William McGregor Paxton; oil on canvas, roughly 30 x 25 inches (76 x 64 cm); in the Corcoran Collection of the National Gallery of Art, DC.

The museum’s page has both zoomable and downloadble high-resolution images. You can also access the high resolution image from this page on Wikimedia Commons.

Exquisite.

Eye Candy for Today: Gerrit Dou’s A Woman playing a Clavichord

A Woman playing a Clavichord, Gerrit Dou
A Woman playing a Clavichord, Gerrit Dou

A Woman playing a Clavichord, Gerrit Dou, oil on panel, roughly 15 x 12 inches (38 x 300 cm); image is from Wikimedia Commons; the original is in the collection of the Dulwich Picture Gallery.

There is also a zoomable version on the Google Art Project, but it’s quite dark, as is the one on the Dulwich site. Presumably they’re the same.

I’ve never seen the original, so it’s difficult to judge the true nature of the darkness and color of the image. However, my experience has been that museums often display images of the paintings in their collections that are much darker than the original. This may be deliberate, I don’t know.

The Wikimedia image, though credited to the Google Art Project, has apparently been brightened by someone along the way. This usually results in overbright, unrealistic images, but in this case — if someone altered this, they knew wht they were doing.

I think the Wikimedia version, which I’ve used here, appears more natural, particularly given that Dou was a contemporary of Vermeer and Pieter de Hooch.

Eye Candy for Today: Steinberg’s iconic View of the World from 9th Avenue

View of the World from 9th Avenue New Yorker cover by Saul Steinberg
View of the World from 9th Avenue New Yorker cover by Saul Steinberg (detail)

View of the World from 9th Avenue, March 29, 1976 cover of The New Yorker, Saul Steinberg; ink, colored pencil and watercolor; 26 x 19 inches (71 x 48 cm).

Whether you’re seeing this for the first time (in which case, you’re welcome), or you’ve seen it a hundred times and had the poster on your wall, it’s always worth looking at this delightful and insightful image of how New Yorkers might see the world.

On the one hand, it can be seen as arrogance on the part of residents of the Big Apple, bit I think Steinberg meant it more as a comment on the way we all have a relativistic view of the world based on the familiarity of our immediate surroundings, and how it affects our perception of events elsewhere.

It was so well received, The New Yorker applied for a copyright assigned to the artist and reproduced it as a very popular poster. Since then it’s been copied, reproduced and reprinted on everything from T-shirts to desk pads. It’s been parodied and played off of countless times.

Unfortunately — and to the dismay of the artist — this became primarily what Steinberg became known for, and not for the overall range of his brilliant drawings and cartoons.

For more on my high regard for this remarkable artist, see my 2006 post on Saul Steinberg.

Eye Candy for Today: Valerius de Saedeleer landscape

View of Tiegem in winter, Valerius de Saedeleer, oil on canvas
View of Tiegem in winter, Valerius de Saedeleer (details), oil on canvas

View of Tiegem in winter, Valerius de Saedeleer; oil on canvas, roughly 39 x 45 inches (100 x 115 cm), liink is to Wikimedia Commons; image was sourced from past Christie’s auction, so presumably the original is in a ptivate collection.

Belgian painter Valerius de Saedeleer, who was active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, was noted for his quiet, contemplative winter scenes, often of the landscape at night.