Lines and Colors art blog

Month: July 2007

  • William B. Hoyt (update)

    I was looking through the website of the Maine Art Gallery (in Kennebunkport), when I was struck by this image. On looking up the artist’s website, I realized I had written a brief post about him a couple of years ago. William B. Hoyt’s clear, precise, realistic approach is most often applied to landscapes and…

  • Drew Struzan

    Drew Struzan is another of those artists, like Michael Deas, whose work you have undoubtedly seen, whether you realize it or not. Struzan is responsible for some of the most famous and recognizable movie posters in recent memory. He has also done art for advertising, book and comic covers, music CD covers and other product…

  • Peter Sylvada

    California painter and illustrator Peter Sylvada paints in a way that makes “painterly” too weak a descriptor. Ranging from muted earth tones to brilliant, impressionist strength colors, his oil paintings are composed of wonderfully bold chunks of color and a wealth of tactile brush texture. From portraits that show the obvious influence of Sargent, to…

  • Jacques-Louis David on
    The Power of Art

    The subject of Simon Schama’s The Power of Art, the BBC/PBS program being broadcast on most PBS stations tonight in the US, is French neo-classical painter Jacques-Louis David. It’s difficult to separate David’s life and work from the political turmoil of his times, in which he was intricately involved; as I pointed out in my…

  • Sundays with Walt and Skeezix (Gasoline Alley by Frank King)

    In 2005 Sunday Press Books published a remarkable collection of Little Nemo in Slumberland, Winsor McCay’s astonishing early 20th Century comic strip, printed at the size of the original full page newspaper comics. (See my post on both McCay and the book.) Thanks to the risky but brilliant choice of format, So Many Splendid Sundays…

  • DC Comics Announces Zudacomics.com

    In the 12 years or so that I’ve been drawing webcomics, I’ve continued to be stupefied by the monumental cluelessness of the major comics companies (with the possible exception of Dark Horse) in regard to online comics. It took Marvel and DC four or five years to even acknowledge their existence, they never seemed to…