Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Donald Jurney

Donald Jurney
Looking at the work of painter Donald Jurney puts me in mind of a number of English, French, Dutch and American landscape painters who were at their peak in the years just prior to the advent of French Impressionism.

His pastoral countrysides and sweeping mountain views are often framed in intriguing plays of light and dark; large areas of shadow lie across the land, punctuated and accented by glimmers of light against mountains or between crowns of trees.

In the limited size of the images on Jurney’s web site and the sites of galleries representing his work, you can only get a vague idea of the texture of the paint strokes in his approach. Fortunately, there is at least one close up of his work, and another slightly smaller close up image on the blog of Quidley & Company galleries that allow you to see his richly textural paint surface.

Jurney uses a carefully controlled, muted palette, with subtle variations in color accompanied by strong value contrasts.

His paintings carry a wonderful sense of place, but simultaneously suggest a feeling of timelessness, as if carrying the traditions of several centuries of landscape painters forward in an unbroken line.

[Via Lia Waichulis and The Hidden Place]

6 thoughts on “Donald Jurney

  1. Raining Acorns

    I appreciate so much all the artists to which you’re introducing us (or at least me) on your site. Jurney’s paintings are exquisite, as is your apt comment, “His paintings carry a wonderful sense of place, but simultaneously suggest a feeling of timelessness, as if carrying the traditions of several centuries of landscape painters forward in an unbroken line.’

    Thank you, again.

  2. matt

    I’ve seen his work in Boston, it is pretty excellent. It’s hard to tell from the images on the web but his style is very interesting and effective. It seems he works with very thin paint and builds the work up in many layers. this allows the shadows and dark areas to really have that sense of space.

    His work feels completely classical and like you said, a continuation in the history of traditional landscape painting, yet his style is totally unique.

  3. Chuck Rosenthal

    The timeless quality of Jurney’s work is somewhat mindful of Vermeer. While they are different, the perfect balance, perfect placement bears a definite resemblance. Were one to believe in past lives…

    I’ve said enough.

  4. gloria henry

    Hi,I really like the article you did on Donald Jurney’s landscapes.I never heard of him before this.Have you ever seen the landscapes of Mary Sipp-Green? I saw those this summer in Martha’s Vineyard and was knocked out by the luminous layers of color.So beautiful.Thanks for the article.Gloria Henry

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