Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban

illustration by Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban
illustrations by Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban

Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban were Austrian born illustrators and stage scene designers who collaborated as well as working independently. In addition, Lefler was a painter and Urban an architect, and they were brothers-in-law.

They were active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I have not idea how to sort out who did what and which illustrations are collaborative, as they are usually shown and listed together.

Their illustrations often incorporated Art Nouveau influenced patterns, both within and surrounding the images.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Jan Bogaerts still life

Still life with a green strainer, Jan Bogaerts still life painting
Still life with a green strainer, Jan Bogaerts still life painting (details)

Still life with a green strainer, Jan Bogaerts

Link is to sold listing on Simonis & Buunk gallery, which has a zoomable version of the image.

Early 20th century Dutch painter Jan Bogaerts has a marvelous touch for portraying the surface textures of his still life objects.

At times his deftly handled light and the tactile quality of his subjects create a contemplative feeling that puts me in mind of the great 18th century French still life and genre painter Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin.

For more, see my previous post on Jan Bogaerts.

 
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Li Yong Hong

Li Yong Hong
Li Yong Hong

Chinese illustrator Li Yong Hong works in scratchboard, a medium that is almost the inverse of pen and ink.

Instead of drawing in ink directly on a white surface, scratchboard is done on a white board that is coated with clay and then coated with a layer of black ink. The black surface is scratched away with needle-like styli, creating white lines by revealing the clay beneath.

The only presence I’ve found on the web for Li Yong Hong’s work is his portfolio on IllustrationX.

 
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Eye Candy for Today: Bernardo Bellotto pen and wash drawing

Imaginary View of Padua, Bernardo Bellotto, pen, black ink and gray wash drawing
Imaginary View of Padua, Bernardo Bellotto, pen, black ink and gray wash drawing

Imaginary View of Padua, Bernardo Bellotto; pen, black ink and gray wash drawing; roughly 13 x 17 inches (32 x 43 cm). Original is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

18th century Italian artist Bernardo Bellotto had a very effective pen and wash technique for rendering architectural subjects that is similar to the wonderful drawings of his uncle and mentor, Antonio Canal, better known as Canaletto.

Imaginary View of Padua, Met Museum

 
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Vladimir Orlovsky (revisited)

Vladimir Orlovsky, Ukrainian landscape painter
Vladimir Orlovsky, Ukrainian landscape painter

Vladimir Orlovsky (alternately: Vladimir Orlovskii or Volodymyr Orlovsky) was a Ukrainian landscape painter, active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who I first profiled in 2014.

Like most of his Ukrainian contemporaries, who lived and worked at a time when Ukraine was part of the Russian Empire, he is often listed as a Russian painter.

Many of his paintings are relatively large in size and scope, so I’ve provided detail crops for all but one of the paintings I’ve featured above.

 
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