Women Painting Women

Women Painting Women: Kerry Brooks, Michele Mitchell-Ostlund, Erika Grofton, Helen Masacz, Sylvia Ji, Lea Colie Wight, Betty Shelton, Rebecca Harp, Heather Horton, Stanka Kordic, Rebecca Alzofon, Susan Lyon
Women Painting Women is an excellent art blog featuring just what the title implies, women artists painting women as their subjects.

The selections focus on contemporary artists working in the figurative tradition. The range of style and approach is nicely varied and the calibre of the work is consistently high.

As much as I like the fact that the blog has a theme, I find it almost irrelevant in that the site is a terrific resource of wonderful contemporary painters, thematic restrictions aside. Some of them are artists I’ve featured previously on Lines and Colors, others will undoubtedly be the subject of future posts.

Founders Sadie Valeri (my post here), Alia El Bermani and Diane Feissel have since March of 2009 been choosing a selection of superb artists, each represented by a single work, their name, basic information about the work and a link to the artist’s web presence. The images in many cases are linked to a larger version.

I had to restrain myself from posting even more sample images than I have here; Women Painting Women is a cornucopia of terrific artists.

(Images above: Kerry Brooks, Michele Mitchell-Ostlund, Erika Grofton, Helen Masacz, Sylvia Ji, Lea Colie Wight, Betty Shelton, Rebecca Harp, Heather Horton, Stanka Kordic, Rebecca Alzofon, Susan Lyon)

[Note: some images on the site should be considered NSFW.]

7 Replies to “Women Painting Women”

  1. So very true! I also paint more women than men, partly because they are more colorful (in the sense of hues of paint). Also, because people buy them. Wonder why paintings of gorgeous men are not so popular, except in Western Art – cowboys and such.

  2. So relieved to find this website!! I’m presently painting a series of women. My artists friends are rather taken aback at my present series. A couple of my friends said “But who would WANT them??”
    I entered one of my women in a show and one of the artists I respect came up to me and said “It’s very good but why paint a woman…why not a man?” By the way , it was the only painting of a female in the show!
    I would have been made to feel that I’m wasting my time EXCEPT that I firmly believe in what I’m doing….as it expresses what I want to say. Thank you..thank you…thank you!!

  3. International Museum of Women:
    http://www.imow.org/exhibitions/past?id=6
    Slide 1 of 54

    Curator’s Statement
    During the 1960s and early 70s, my transition into adulthood coincided with the birth and growth of the women’s movement in the United States. The huge social changes gained in that period have given women an opportunity for independence that is exhilarating, not only for those of my generation. A sense of infinite possibilities coupled with the freedom to express them have made women a force to be reckoned with.
    Claudia DeMonte

Comments are closed.