He who knows how to appreciate colour relationships, the influence of one colour on another, their contrasts and dissonances, is promised an infinitely diverse imagery.
- Sonia Delaunay
Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
- Colour is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.
 

 

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938

Posted by Charley Parker at 2:35 pm

Rene Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938
Belgian painter René Magritte went through several phases in his career. The phase and style for which he is most noted is associated with Surrealism, but might be best though of as “magic realism”.

Magritte spent some time in Paris, where he met Surrealist leader André Breton, and became part of the Surrealist circle, though he was never really a good fit with the group.

Magritte was not a facile painter, like Dalí,or an innovative experimenter with technique, like Max Ernst. Magritte was a painter of ideas, and in his approach emphasized clarity in conveying them, however enigmatic the ideas themselves may have been.

The Museum of Modern Art in New York has mounted an exhibition of his work from a twelve year period in which his works most associated with Surrealism were developed. It includes several of his most iconic paintings.

There is an interactive associated with the exhibition. Unfortunately, it is hampered by an interface that seems to be deliberately designed to make browsing images a wretched experience.

Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938 will be on display at the MoMA until January 12, 2014. From there it moves to The Menil Collection in Houston for a run from February 14 – June 1, 2014, and then to the Art Institute of Chicago from June 25 – October 12, 2014.

See my previous posts on Rene Magritte (and here).

1 comment for Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938 »

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  1. Comment by Ælle
    Monday, October 21, 2013 @ 6:37 am

    “To be a surrealist means barring from your mind all remembrance of what you have seen, and being always on the lookout for what has never been.”
    René Magritte quote

    “… what you have seen” meant that he had seen his mother’s naked body dragged out of the river Sambre with only her wet nightgown covering her face. She was suicidal and he was 13 years old!
    http://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/suicide

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