Lines and Colors art blog
  • A few paintings from 1888

    Charles Edward Perugini
    A few paintings from 1888, Emil Zschimmer, Olga Boznańska, Peder Mork Monsted, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, John Singer Sargent, Vincent van Gogh, Joaquin Sorolla

    Most of these were sourced from this page on Wikimedia Commons.

    I think the late 19th and early 20th centuries produced an extraordinary bounty of wonderful paintings.

    (Images above, links are to my articles: Charles Edward Perugini, Emil Zschimmer, Olga Boznańska, Peder Mørk Mønsted, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, John Singer Sargent, Vincent van Gogh, Joaquín Sorolla)


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  • Eye Candy for Today: Whistler etching of Annie Haden

    Annie Haden, James McNeill Whistler, drypoint etching

    Annie Haden, James McNeill Whistler, drypoint etching

    Annie Haden, James McNeill Whistler, drypoint, roughly 19 x 13 inches (35 x 21 cm).

    This printing of the plate is in the Smithsonian National Museum of Asian Art, which has both a zoomable and downloadable version of the file. (The museum has a collection of Whistler’s work, presumably in his role as an American artist who took much interest in and inspiration from Asian art, design and culture.) I’ve taken the liberty of lightening the image somewhat, so you can see the details better.

    This is one of several etchings and drypoints Whistler made of his neice, Annie Haden, at verious ages. This one is a particularly beautiful and extensively refined composition. Annie is posed rather formally in a long cape and skirt; her head is tilted and she looks directly at the viewer.

    I suppose you could interpret her expression in several ways, one of which might be tired resignation at the boring task of posing, yet again, for her uncle.

    The print is a good example of Whistler’s mastery of subtle drypoint linework.

    Drypoint is a printmaking technique related to — and often combined with — etching, in which lines are incised directly into the plate with an etching needle, rather being etched into the plate with acid. This often leaves a burr of metal at the side of the incised line, giving the lines a soft, slightly rough feeling.


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  • Ann Lofquist

    Ann Lofquist
    Ann Lofquist

    Ann Lofquist is a Massachusssetts based painter who paints in oil, both plen air and studio works. She takes as her subjects streams, fields, farms, woods and at times mountains. These are often handled in a cinematic ratio or even more severly horizontal proportions.

    I find her work particualry appealing for all of the factors I mention above. Her paintings have a distinct and naturalistic feeling of place, time, atmosphere and light.

    I can’t find a dedicated website or blog for Lofquist, but her work can currently be seen in a solo show at the Gross McCleaf Gallery here in Philadelphia. The show is on display until until March 2nd, 2024.

    This page has some background on the artist and some information about her process.

    After the show, you should still be able to see images of her work on the gallery’s site as one of their regularly represented artists.

    There is a very nice film about Lofquist and her work by Philadelphia filmmaker John Thornton on YouTube.

    I’ve added what I can find of other gallery representation and a couple of interviews.


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  • Eye Candy for Today: Marie-Francois Firmin-Girard’s market

    Autumn Market at Les Halles, Marie-Francois Firmin-Girard
    Autumn Market at Les Halles (details), Marie-Francois Firmin-Girard

    Autumn Market at Les Halles, Marie-François Firmin-Girard; oil on canvas, roughly 33 x 46″ (83 x 117 cm). Link is to page on Wikimedia Commons, with access to high-res file. Original is in a private collection.

    19th century French painter Marie-François Firmin-Girard (alternately, François-Marie Firmin-Girard) worked in a naturalistic, often highly detailed manner that carried forward traditional values and resisted the influence of the Impressionists that eventually swayed many of his contemporaries.

    Here, he provides an intricate presentation of a bustling Paris market, awash in detail, yet visually organized by his use of value and muted color.


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  • Eye Candy for Valentine’s Day: Joseph Noel Paton’s Hesperus

    Hesperus, the Evening Star, Sacred to Lovers
    Hesperus, the Evening Star, Sacred to Lovers

    Hesperus, the Evening Star, Sacred to Lovers, Joseph Noel Paton; oil on millboard, roughly 36 x 27 inches (91 x 69 cm). Link it to zoomable image on Art Renewal. There is a larger downloadable file on Arthive.

    Though not actually a member of the group, Scottish painter Joseph Noel Paton was loosely associated with the Pre-Raphaelites, and was a friend of Millais.

    Hesperus, in Greek mythology, is the personification of Venus as the Evening Star, which we see through the tree branches above the lovers.

    My experience with Pre-Raphaelite and other Victorian paintings makes me believe there is symbolic significance to the particuar flowers and fauna around the couple, but if so, I don’t know what the reference is in this case.


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  • Josep Tapiró y Baró

    Josep Tapiro y Baro, wateroclor portraits from Morocco
    Josep Tapiro y Baro, wateroclor portraits from Morocco

    Josep Tapiró y Baró was a Catalan painter active in the late 19th and early 20th century.

    He spent the latter part of his life in Morocco, and his watercolor portraits of some of the people there — dressed in their most colorful traditional garb — were quite popular for a time with European and American aficionados of Orientalist art.


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